Throng meaning

thrông, thrŏng
The definition of a throng is a large group of people or animals.

When a huge group of people crowds together in a restaurant, this is an example of a throng of people.

noun
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Throng is defined as a large group crowds or fills a place, or flocks somewhere in great numbers.

When a large group of people all crowd together into a sporting arena, this is an example of a situation where people throng the arena.

verb
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A large group of things; a host.
noun
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A large group of people gathered or crowded closely together; a multitude.
noun
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To crowd into; fill.

Commuters thronging the subway platform.

verb
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To press against in large numbers.

The fans thronged the rock star.

verb
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To gather, press, or move in a throng.
verb
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A great number of people gathered together; crowd.
noun
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A crowding together of people; crowded condition.
noun
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Any great number of things massed or considered together; multitude.
noun
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To gather together, move, or press in a throng.
verb
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To crowd or press upon in large numbers.
verb
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To crowd into; fill with a multitude.
verb
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A group of people crowded or gathered closely together; a multitude.
noun
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A group of things; a host or swarm.
noun
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To crowd into a place, especially to fill it.
verb
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(intransitive) To congregate.
verb
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To crowd or press, as persons; to oppress or annoy with a crowd of living beings.
verb
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(Scotland, Northern England, dialect) Filled with persons or objects; crowded.
adjective
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Origin of throng

  • Middle English from Old English gethrang

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old English þrang, Ä¡eþrang (“crowd, press, tumult"), from Proto-Germanic *þrangwÄ…, *þrangwō (“throng"), *þrangwaz (“push, drive"), from Proto-Indo-European *trenk(w)- (“to beat, hew, press"). Cognate with Dutch drang (“urge, push, impulse"), German Drang (“urge, drive, impulse"), Danish trang (“urge"), Norwegian trong (“need"), Icelandic þröng (“narrow, tightly pressed, crowd, throng") and Swedish trÃ¥ng (“tight, narrow"). Probably related to Albanian drojë (“fear, fear of the crowd") and to drang (“huge rod, pole, oar"). More at thring.

    From Wiktionary