Invade definition

ĭn-vād
To enter and spread through with harmful effects.

A body invaded by pathogens.

verb
7
1
To make an invasion.

The cancer had invaded deeply into his liver.

verb
7
4
To enter and proliferate in bodily tissue, as a pathogen.

Bacteria have invaded the lungs.

verb
1
0
To enter by force in order to conquer or pillage.

The Romans invaded Britain.

verb
2
2
To enter as if by invading; overrun or crowd.

Each weekend, skiers invade the mountain town.

verb
2
2
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To enter forcibly or hostilely; come into as an enemy.
verb
2
2
To crowd into; throng.

Tourists invading the beaches.

verb
2
2
To make an invasion.
verb
2
2
To intrude upon; infringe; violate.

To invade someone's privacy.

verb
1
1
To make an invasion.

The cancer had invaded deeply into the liver.

verb
1
1
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Under some circumstances police are allowed to invade a person's privacy.

verb
0
0
To enter by force in order to conquer.

Argentinian troops invaded the Falkland Islands in 1982.

verb
0
0

The picnic was invaded by ants.

verb
0
0
To attack; to infringe; to encroach on; to violate.

The king invaded the rights of the people.

verb
0
0
To enter and proliferate in bodily tissue, as a pathogen.

Bacteria have invaded the lungs.

verb
1
2
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To encroach or intrude on; violate.

Invade someone's privacy.

verb
1
2

Origin of invade

  • Middle English from Old French invader from Latin invādere in- in in–2 vādere to go

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin invādō, invādere (“enter, invade”).

    From Wiktionary