Raid meaning

rād
To raid is to take something quickly and stealthily or to launch a surprise attack or surprise visit.

An example of to raid is when you sneak down and take all the cookies from the cookie jar.

An example of to raid is when the military drops a bomb in a surprise attack.

verb
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The definition of a raid is a surprise attack or surprise visit, especially when done by the military during war or by police to arrest suspects.

An example of a raid is when an army launches a surprise attack.

An example of a raid is when police show up unannounced to a suspected drug den to arrest the drug dealers.

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A surprise attack by a small armed force.
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A sudden forcible entry into a place by police.

A raid on a gambling den.

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An entrance into another's territory for the purpose of seizing goods or valuables.
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A predatory operation mounted against a competitor, especially an attempt to lure away the personnel or membership of a competing organization.
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An attempt to seize control of a company, as by acquiring a majority of its stock.
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An attempt by speculators to drive stock prices down by coordinated selling.
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To make a raid on.
verb
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To conduct a raid or participate in one.
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Any sudden invasion of a place, as by police, for discovering and dealing with violations of the law.
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An attempt, as by a business concern, to lure employees from a competitor.
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A deliberate attempt by one or more speculators to cause a quick, unexpected fall in stock market prices.
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To make a raid or raids (on)
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(Redundant Array of Independent Disks) A disk or solid state drive (SSD) subsystem that increases performance or provides fault tolerance or both. RAID uses two or more physical drives and a RAID controller, which is plugged into motherboards that do not have RAID circuits. Today, most motherboards have built-in RAID but not necessarily every RAID configuration (see below). In the past, RAID was also accomplished by software only but was much slower. In the late 1980s, the "I" in RAID stood for "inexpensive" but was later changed to "independent."In large storage area networks (SANs), floor-standing RAID units are common with terabytes of storage and huge amounts of cache memory. RAID is also used in desktop computers by gamers for speed and by business users for reliability. Following are the various RAID configurations. See NAS and SAN.RAID 0 - Striping for Performance (Popular)Widely used for gaming, striping interleaves data across multiple drives for performance. However, there are no safeguards against failure. See RAID 0.RAID 1 - Mirroring for Fault Tolerance (Popular)Widely used, RAID 1 writes two drives at the same time. It provides the highest reliability but doubles the number of drives needed.RAID 10 combines RAID 1 mirroring with RAID 0 striping for both safety and performance. See RAID 1 and RAID 10.RAID 3 - Speed and Fault ToleranceData are striped across three or more drives for performance, and parity is computed for safety. Similar to RAID 3, RAID 4 uses block level striping but is not as popular. See RAID 3 and RAID parity.RAID 5 - Speed and Fault Tolerance (Popular)Data are striped across three or more drives for performance, and parity is computed for safety. RAID 5 is similar to RAID 3, except that the parity is distributed to all drives. RAID 6 offers more reliability than RAID 5 by performing more parity computations. For more details, see RAID 5.
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A storage technology that distributes data across a group of physically separate hard drives configured as a single logical memory unit. As RAID stores all data on redundant drives, it provides a considerable level of fault tolerance. RAID may involve drives on multiple servers in a cluster connected via a storage area network (SAN). A simpler and less expensive approach is known as just a bunch of disks (JBOD), which essentially is a bunch of disk drivers not configured as a RAID. See also JBOD, SAN, and server.
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A hostile or predatory incursion; an inroad or incursion of mounted men; a sudden and rapid invasion by a cavalry force; a foray.
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An attack or invasion for the purpose of making arrests, seizing property, or plundering; as, a raid of the police upon a gambling house; a raid of contractors on the public treasury.
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(online gaming) A large group in a massively multiplayer online game, consisting of multiple parties who team up to defeat a powerful enemy.
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(sports) An attacking movement.
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To engage in a raid.
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To steal from; pillage.
verb
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To lure from another; to entice away from.
verb
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To indulge oneself by taking from.
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(computing) A redundant array of inexpensive disks, or, less frequently restated as a redundant array of independent disks.
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Origin of raid

  • Scots raid on horseback from Middle English rade from Old English rād a riding, road reidh- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Scots raid (obsolete after Middle English but revived in the 19th-century by Walter Scott), from Old English rād (> English road).
    From Wiktionary