Foray meaning

fôrā, fŏrā
Frequency:
A sudden raid or military advance.
noun
1
0
To make inroads, as for profit or adventure.
verb
1
0
The definition of a foray is a sudden short attack or move into enemy territory, or is an effort to branch out and try something new.

When a military force suddenly goes into the territory of its enemy, this is an example of a foray.

When you start to try dabbling in cooking for the first time, this is an example of a foray into cooking.

noun
0
0
To make a raid.
verb
0
0
A sudden attack or raid into enemy territory, as to seize something or to plunder.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A sudden or irregular incursion in border warfare; hence, any irregular incursion for war or spoils; a raid.
noun
0
0
A brief excursion or attempt especially outside one's accustomed sphere.
noun
0
0
To scour (an area or place) for food, treasure, booty etc.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To pillage; to ravage.
verb
0
0
A venture or an initial attempt, especially outside one's usual area.

An actor's foray into politics.

noun
0
1
Advertisement
To make a foray (into enemy territory, an unfamiliar situation, etc.)
verb
0
1
A venturing into any new or unfamiliar situation or undertaking.
noun
0
1

Origin of foray

  • Middle English forrai from forraien to plunder probably back-formation from forreour raider, plunderer from Old French forrier from forrer to forage forage

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English forrayen (“to pillage”), a back-formation of forrayour, forreour, forrier (“raider, pillager”), from Old French forrier, fourrier, a derivative of fuerre (“provender, fodder, straw”), from Frankish *fōdar (“fodder, sheath”), from Proto-Germanic *fōdrą (“fodder, feed, sheath”), from Proto-Indo-European *patrom (“fodder”), *pat- (“to feed”), *pāy- (“to guard, graze, feed”). Cognate with Old High German fuotar (German Futter (“fodder, feed”)), Old English fōdor, fōþor (“food, fodder, covering, case, basket”), Dutch voeder (“forage, food, feed”), Danish foder (“fodder, feed”), Icelandic fóður (“fodder, sheath”). More at fodder, food.

    From Wiktionary