Attempt meaning

ə-tĕmpt'
Attempt is defined as to make an effort to do something.

An example of attempt is to try to complete a large jigsaw puzzle in one sitting.

verb
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To try to perform, make, or achieve.

Attempted to read the novel in one sitting; attempted a difficult dive.

verb
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An effort or a try.
noun
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To tempt.
verb
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To try to seize or get control of by attacking.
verb
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To tempt.
verb
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An attack; an assault.

An attempt on someone's life.

noun
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To make an effort to do, get, have, etc.; try; endeavor.
verb
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A try.
noun
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An attack, as on a person's life.
noun
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The intentional and overt taking of a substantial step toward the commission of a crime that falls short of completing the crime. The mere planning of a crime, as well as soliciting another to commit the crime, does not constitute an attempt to commit the crime. Attempt is a crime distinct from the offense that the criminal was attempting to commit. Various legal tests are used to determine when, between planning a crime and committing it, a person’s actions constitute an attempt. See also conspiracy and solicitation.
noun
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To try.

I attempted to sing, but my throat was too hoarse.

To attempt an escape from prison.

A group of 80 budding mountaineers attempted Kilimanjaro, but 30 of them didn't make it to the top.

verb
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(archaic) To try to win, subdue, or overcome.

One who attempts the virtue of a woman.

verb
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(archaic) To attack; to make an effort or attack upon; to try to take by force.

To attempt the enemy's camp.

verb
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The action of trying at something. [1530]
noun
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An assault or attack, especially an assassination attempt. [1580]
noun
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The definition of an attempt is an effort made to accomplish something.

An example of an attempt is a baby trying to take his first few steps.

noun
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attempt the life of
  • To try to kill.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

attempt the life of

Origin of attempt

  • Middle English attempten from Old French attempter from Latin attemptāre ad- ad- temptāre to test
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Late 14th century, from Old French atempter, from Latin attemptō (“I try, solicit”), from ad (“to”) + temptare, more correctly tentare (“to try”); see tempt. The noun is from the 1530s, the sense "an assault on somebody's life, assassination attempt" (French attentat) is from 1580.
    From Wiktionary