Tempt meaning

tĕmpt
To tempt is to try to entice someone to do something, or to have an urge or desire to do something.

When you try to entice someone to come to a party with the promise of good food, this is an example of a time when you tempt him.

When you tell a lie that might be discovered, this is an example of a time when you tempt fate.

verb
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To try to get (someone) to do wrong, especially by a promise of reward.
verb
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To be inviting or attractive to.

A second helping tempted me. We refused the offer even though it tempted us.

verb
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To provoke or to risk provoking.

Don't tempt fate.

verb
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To cause to be strongly disposed.

He was tempted to walk out.

verb
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To incline strongly.

To be tempted to accept.

verb
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To be attractive or inviting.

A meal that tempts.

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(archaic) To test; try.
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To try to persuade; induce or entice, esp. to something immoral or sensually pleasurable.
verb
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To rouse desire in; be inviting to; attract.
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To provoke or run the risk of provoking (fate, etc.)
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To provoke someone to do wrong, especially by promising a reward; to entice.

She tempted me to eat the apple.

verb
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To attract; to allure.

Its glossy skin tempted me.

verb
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To provoke something; to court.

It would be tempting fate.

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Origin of tempt

  • Middle English tempten from Old French tempter from Latin temptāre to feel, try

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French tempter (French: tenter), from Latin temptare, more correctly tentare (“to handle, touch, try, test, tempt"), frequentative of tenere (“to hold"). Displaced native Old English costning (“temptation").

    From Wiktionary