Bait meaning

bāt
Bait is defined as to tempt someone or something.

An example of bait is setting out delicious smelling cinnamon rolls for sampling in an attempt to get people to buy more cinnamon rolls.

verb
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(dial.) A large amount.

We wolfed down a bait of huckleberries.

noun
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Bait means to upset through saying and/or doing something that will annoy or hurt another.

An example of bait is when an investigator is interviewing a suspect, and he says insulting and demeaning things to get the person upset in order to judge his reactions.

An example of bait is to whip a dog mercilessly, causing him to attack and bite another dog in a fight.

verb
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To place a lure in (a trap) or on (a fishing hook).
verb
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To entice or provoke, especially by trickery or strategy.

He baited me into selling him my bike by saying how much I deserved a better one.

verb
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An enticement, temptation, or provocation.

He did not take the bait by responding to the taunt and getting drawn into an argument.

noun
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To set dogs upon (a chained animal, for example) for sport.
verb
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To taunt or torment (someone), as with persistent insults or ridicule.
verb
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To feed (an animal), especially on a journey.
verb
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To stop for food or rest during a trip.
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To torment or harass with unprovoked, vicious, repeated attacks.
verb
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To tease or goad, esp. so as to provoke a reaction.
verb
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To put food, etc. on (a hook or trap) to lure animals or fish.
verb
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To lure; tempt; entice.
verb
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(archaic) To feed (animals) during a break in a journey.
verb
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(archaic) To stop for food during a journey.
verb
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Food, etc. put on a hook or trap to lure fish or animals.
noun
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Anything used as a lure; enticement.
noun
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(archaic) A stop for rest or food during a journey.
noun
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Any substance, especially food, used in catching fish, or other animals, by alluring them to a hook, snare, trap, or net.
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Food containing poison or a harmful additive to kill animals that are pests.
noun
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Anything which allures; a lure; enticement; temptation.

noun
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A portion of food or drink, as a refreshment taken on a journey; also, a stop for rest and refreshment.
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A light or hasty luncheon.
noun
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To attract with bait; to entice.
verb
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To affix bait to a trap or a fishing hook or fishing line.
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To set dogs on (an animal etc.) to bite or worry; to attack with dogs, especially for sport.

To bait a bear with dogs; to bait a bull.

verb
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To intentionally annoy, torment, or threaten by constant rebukes or threats; to harass.
verb
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(now rare) To feed and water (a horse or other animal), especially during a journey.
verb
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(intransitive) Of a horse or other animal: to take food, especially during a journey.
verb
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To stop to take a portion of food and drink for refreshment during a journey.
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(obsolete, intransitive) To flap the wings; to flutter as if to fly; or to hover, as a hawk when she stoops to her prey.
verb
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The definition of bait is a person, place, or thing used to attract.

An example of bait is the worm used on the end of a pole to attract fish.

An example of bait is the poisonous trap used for killing ants in the house.

An example of bait is a sheep left out in a field in order to lure the wolf.

noun
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Origin of bait

  • Middle English from Old Norse beita food, fodder, fish bait V., from Old Norse beita to put animals to pasture, hunt with dogs bheid- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English baiten, beiten, from Old Norse beita (“to bait, cause to bite, feed, hunt”), from Proto-Germanic *baitijaną (“to cause to bite, bridle”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (“to cleave, split, separate”). Cognate with Icelandic beita (“to bait”), Swedish beta (“to bait, pasture, graze”), German beizen (“to cause to bite, bait”), Old English bǣtan (“to bait, hunt, bridle, bit”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English bait, beite, from Old Norse beita (“food, bait”), from Proto-Germanic *baitō (“that which is bitten, bait”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (“to cleave, split, separate”). Cognate with German Beize (“mordant, corrosive fluid; marinade; hunting”), Old English bāt (“that which can be bitten, food, bait”). Related to bite.

    From Wiktionary

  • French battre de l'aile or des ailes, to flap or flutter.

    From Wiktionary