Wage definitions

wāj
Wage is money paid to a worker for work performed, or the price you pay for doing something wrong or unwise.

If you make $10 per hour at work, this is an example of your wage.

If the consequences of a lie is punishment, this is an example of a time when the wages of lies are punishment.

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To wage is to conduct or carry on a campaign against something.

When you campaign against higher taxes, this is an example of a time when you wage a campaign against taxation.

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A regular payment, usually on an hourly, daily, or weekly basis, made by an employer to an employee, especially for manual or unskilled work.
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The price of labor in an economy.
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A fitting return; a recompense.

The wages of sin.

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To engage in (a war or campaign, for example).
verb
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To engage in or carry on (a war, struggle, campaign, etc.)
verb
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To hire.
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Money paid to an employee for work done, and usually figured on an hourly, daily, or piecework basis.
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What is given in return; recompense; requital.

“The wages of sin is death”

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The share of the total product of industry that goes to labor, as distinguished from the share taken by capital.
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The payment to an employee, usually based on hours worked or quantity of goods or services produced.
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An amount of money paid to a worker for a specified quantity of work, usually expressed on an hourly basis.
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Shakespeare.

To wake and wage a danger profitless.

verb
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Holinshed.

Abundance of treasure which he had in store, wherewith he might wage soldiers.

verb
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To conduct or carry out (a war or other contest).
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To adventure, or lay out, for hire or reward; to hire out.
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Origin of wage

From Anglo-Norman, from Old Northern French wage, a northern variant of Old French gauge, guage (whence modern French gage), itself (possibly through a Vulgar Latin root *wadium) from Frankish *waddi, wadja (cognate with Old English wedd), from Proto-Germanic *wadjō, *wadi- (“pledge"), from Proto-Indo-European *wadh- (“to pledge, redeem a pledge"). Akin to Old Norse veþja "to pledge", Gothic wadi. Cf. also the doublet gage. More at wed. Possible contributory etylomolgy from from the Old English wæge (meaning "weight," as wages at times have been goods or coin measured on a scale).