Rate meaning

rāt
The definition of a rate is a quantity measured and compared to another quantity measured (such as a number of miles per hour) or is the cost of something.

An example of a rate is being paid $10 per hour.

An example of a rate is the price of gas.

noun
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Rate is defined as to judge or estimate the value of something.

An example of to rate is to assign scores in a singing competition.

verb
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A quantity measured with respect to another measured quantity.

A rate of speed of 60 miles an hour.

noun
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A charge or payment calculated in relation to a particular sum or quantity.

Interest rates.

noun
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To be ranked in a particular class.

A wine that rates higher than any other.

verb
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Level of quality.
noun
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(chiefly british) To value for purposes of taxation.
verb
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(informal) To merit or deserve.

People that rate special treatment; an idea that rates attention.

verb
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A price or value; specif., the cost per unit of some commodity, service, etc.

Insurance rate.

noun
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A measure of a part with respect to a whole; a proportion.

The mortality rate; a tax rate.

noun
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To regard or consider as having a certain value.

Rated the movie excellent; rated him a fine cook.

verb
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The amount, degree, etc. of anything in relation to units of something else.

The rate of pay per month, rate of speed per hour.

noun
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A fixed ratio; proportion.
noun
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Speed of movement or action.

To read at a moderate rate.

noun
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The amount of time gained or lost by a timepiece within a specified period.
noun
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(now rare) A class or rank.

Of the first rate.

noun
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(brit.) A local property tax.
noun
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(obs.) Amount; quantity.
noun
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(u.s. navy) The grade of a petty officer within a rating.

The sailor's rate is Quartermaster first class.

noun
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To estimate the value, worth, strength, capacity, etc. of; appraise.
verb
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To consider; esteem.

They are rated among the best.

verb
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To fix or determine the rates for.
verb
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(informal) To deserve.

To rate an increase.

verb
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To be classed or ranked.
verb
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To have value, status, or rating.
verb
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To scold severely; chide.
verb
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A fixed or stated price for a specified unit of a commodity or service, such as $2 per pound or $9 per hour; a percentage of an amount, such as.
noun
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The proportional relationship between one amount, value etc. and another. [from the 15th century]

At the height of his powers, he was producing pictures at the rate of four a year.

noun
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Speed. [from the 17th century]

The car was speeding down here at a hell of a rate.

noun
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The relative speed of change or progress. [from the 18th century]

The rate of production at the factory is skyrocketing.

noun
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The price of (an individual) thing; cost. [from the 16th century]

He asked quite a rate to take me to the airport.

noun
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A set price or charge for all examples of a given case, commodity, service etc. [from the 16th century]

Postal rates here are low.

noun
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A wage calculated in relation to a unit of time.

We pay an hourly rate of between $10 - $15 per hour depending on qualifications and experience.

noun
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Any of various taxes, especially those levied by a local authority. [from the 17th century]

I hardly have enough left every month to pay the rates.

noun
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(nautical) A class into which ships were assigned based on condition, size etc.; by extension, rank.

This textbook is first-rate.

noun
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(horology) The gain or loss of a timepiece in a unit of time.

Daily rate; hourly rate; etc.

noun
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To assign or be assigned a particular rank or level.

She is rated fourth in the country.

verb
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To evaluate or estimate the value of.

They rate his talents highly.

verb
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He rated this book brilliant.

verb
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To deserve; to be worth.

The view here hardly rates a mention in the travel guide.

verb
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The transformer is rated at 10 watts.

verb
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(chiefly UK) To evaluate a property's value for the purposes of local taxation.
verb
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(informal) To like; to think highly of.

The customers don't rate the new burgers.

verb
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(intransitive) To have position (in a certain class).

She rates among the most excellent chefs in the world.

He rates as the best cyclist in the country.

verb
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(intransitive) To have value or standing.

This last performance of hers didn't rate very high with the judges.

verb
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To ratify.
verb
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To ascertain the exact rate of the gain or loss of (a chronometer) as compared with true time.
verb
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verb
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The cost per unit of a commodity or service.

Postal rates.

noun
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(chiefly british) A locally assessed property tax.
noun
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To set a rate for (goods to be shipped).
verb
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(informal) To have status, importance, or influence.

Tea-flavored ice cream doesn't rate highly in my book.

verb
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To berate.
verb
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To express reproof.
verb
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Percent interest on capital; a relative or proportional value.
noun
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1
at any rate
  • Whatever the case may be; in any case:
    You should at any rate apologize.
  • Used to indicate a revision or correction to a previous remark:
    We were delighted, or at any rate satisfied, with the results.
idiom
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at any rate
  • in any event; whatever happens
  • at least; anyway
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of rate

  • Middle English from Old French from Medieval Latin rata proportion short for Latin (prō) ratā (parte) (according to a) fixed (part) from feminine ablative past participle of rērī to consider, reckon ar- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English raten perhaps of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English raten (“to scold, chide"), from Old Norse hrata (“to refuse, reject, slight, find fault with"), from Proto-Germanic *hratōnÄ… (“to sway, shake"), from Proto-Indo-European *krad- (“to swing"). Cognate with Swedish rata (“to reject, refuse, find fault, slight"), Norwegian rata (“to reject, cast aside"), Old English hratian (“to rush, hasten").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old French, from Medieval Latin rata, from Latin prō ratā parte, from ratus (“fixed"), from rÄ“rÄ« (“think, deem, judge, originally reckon, calculate").

    From Wiktionary