Meter meaning

mētər
The definition of meter is a pattern of beats, the basic linear measurement of the metric system, or a person or device that measures.

An example of a meter is the basic rhythm of a song.

An example of a meter is 39.37 inches.

An example of a meter is a land surveyor who measures property boundaries.

noun
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A postage meter.
noun
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Measuring device.

Anemometer.

suffix
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Meter is defined as measure, or give a measured amount.

An example of meter is measuring the size of a house lot.

verb
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The basic pattern of beats in successive measures of a piece of music: it is usually indicated in the time signature.
noun
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The international standard unit of length, approximately equivalent to 39.37 inches. It was redefined in 1983 as the distance traveled by light in a vacuum in 1/299,792,458 of a second.
noun
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The basic SI unit of length, a meter is equivalent to approximately 1.094 yard, or 39.37 inches.The meter was originally determined by Napoleonic scientists at the French Academy of Sciences as one ten millionth (10 -7 ) of the distance between the North Pole and the Earth's equator through Paris, France.The meter was then recorded as the distance between two fine lines engraved on a platinum-iridium bar kept at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures in Paris. The meter is now defined as the distance traveled by light in a vacuum in 1 / 299,792,458 seconds. See also SI.
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The basic unit of length in the metric system, equal to 39.37 inches.
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The basic unit of the metric system (39.37 inches). A yard is about 9/10ths of a meter (0.9144 meter). See metric system.
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Any of various devices designed to measure time, distance, speed, or intensity or indicate and record or regulate the amount or volume, as of the flow of a gas or an electric current.
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(always meter) A device that measures things.
noun
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A parking meter.
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(dated) One who metes or measures.

A labouring coal-meter.

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(chiefly US, elsewhere metre) The base unit of length in the International System of Units (SI), conceived of as 1/10000000 of the distance from the North Pole to the Equator, and now defined as the distance light will travel in a vacuum in 1/299792458 second.
noun
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(chiefly US, elsewhere metre) (music) An increment of music; the overall rhythm; particularly, the number of beats in a measure.
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(chiefly US, elsewhere metre, prosody) The rhythm pattern in a poem.
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(chiefly US, elsewhere metre) A line above or below a hanging net, to which the net is attached in order to strengthen it.
noun
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To imprint a postage mark with a postage meter.
verb
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A parking meter.
noun
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To measure with a meter.

Meter a flow of water.

verb
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To supply in a measured or regulated amount.

Metered the allotted gasoline to each vehicle.

verb
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To imprint with postage or other revenue stamps by means of a postage meter or similar device.

Metering bulk mail.

verb
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To provide with a parking meter or parking meters.

Meter parking spaces.

verb
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The basic unit of linear measure in the metric system, equal to 39.3701 inches: now defined in the SI system as the distance light travels in a vacuum in 1/299,792,458 of a second.
noun
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A person who measures; esp., an official who measures commodities.
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To measure or record with a meter or meters.
verb
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To provide in measured quantities.
verb
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To process (mail) with a postage meter.
verb
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A device for measuring (a specified thing)

Thermometer, barometer.

affix
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A line of verse having (a specified number of) metrical feet.

Heptameter.

affix
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To measure with a metering device.
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Origin of meter

  • Fr -mètre or ModL -metrum, both < Gr metron, a measure: see meter

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English meter and from Old French metre both from Latin metrum from Greek metron measure, poetic meter mē-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French -mètre from Greek metron measure mē-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French mètre from Greek metron measure mē-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From –meter

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French mètre, from Ancient Greek μέτρον (metron, “measure")

    From Wiktionary