Verse meaning

vûrs
A poetic form with regular meter and a fixed rhyme scheme.

Restoration literature is well known for its carefully constructed verse.

noun
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8
One of several similar units of a song, consisting of several lines, generally rhymed.

Note the shift in tone between the first verse and the second.

noun
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6
Poetic form in general.

The restrictions of verse have been steadily relaxed over time.

noun
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verb
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To educate about, to teach about.

He versed us in the finer points of category theory.

verb
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(fandom slang) The (fictional) universe in which Firefly is set.
noun
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3
Verse is writing that has a specific rhythm to it or a specific section of a writing.

An example of verse is a poem.

An example of verse is a stanza or group of four lines in a poem.

noun
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4
Forming compounds nouns denoting the fictional world of a given character, television series etc. [from 20th c.]
suffix
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4
Metrical writing that lacks depth or artistic merit.
noun
5
4
One of the numbered subdivisions of a chapter in the Bible.
noun
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4
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A small section of the Jewish or Christian Bible.
noun
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To tell in verse, or poetry.
verb
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4
Forming compound nouns denoting the whole range or totality of what is indicated by the first element. [from 20th c.]
suffix
5
4
(colloquial) To oppose, to be an opponent for, as in a game, contest or battle.
verb
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To versify or engage in versifying.
verb
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3
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To familiarize by study or experience.

He versed himself in philosophy.

verb
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A sequence of words arranged metrically in accordance with some rule or design; single line of poetry.
noun
3
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To play against (an opponent) in a competition.
verb
3
4
Metrical or rhymed composition as distinct from prose; poetry.
noun
2
2
A particular type of metrical composition, such as blank verse or free verse.
noun
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A stanza or similar short subdivision of a song or poem, sometimes specif. as distinguished from the chorus or refrain.
noun
2
2
Any of the single, usually numbered, short divisions of a chapter of the Bible, generally a sentence.
noun
2
2

Origin of verse

  • Middle English vers from Old English fers and from Old French vers both from Latin versus from past participle of vertere to turn wer-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably back-formation from versus taken as verses in such phrases as Boston versus New York

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Latin versāre versatile

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Partly from Old English vers; partly, from Old French vers; both, from Latin versus (“a line in writing, and in poetry a verse; (originally) row, furrow"), from vertō (“to turn around").

    From Wiktionary

  • Back-formation from versus, misconstrued as a third-person singular verb *verses.

    From Wiktionary

  • Shortening of universe.

    From Wiktionary

  • From universe.

    From Wiktionary