Rhyme meaning

rīm
Rhyme is defined as to speak in words or phrases with the same ending sound or to create a written piece out of such phrases.

An example of rhyme is to say the words "bike" and "like."

An example of rhyme is what William Blake did when he wrote "The Lamb."

verb
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Correspondence of terminal sounds of words or of lines of verse.
noun
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To form a rhyme.
verb
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A word that corresponds with another in terminal sound, as behold and cold.
noun
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Correspondence of sound between stressed syllables at the ends of words or lines of verse; specif., perfect rhyme.
noun
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A word that corresponds with another in sound, esp. end sound.
noun
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To make verse, esp. rhyming verse.
verb
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To form a rhyme.

“more” rhymes with “door”

verb
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To be composed in metrical form with rhymes.
verb
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To be in accord or agreement.

The eyewitness accounts rhyme on the essential points.

verb
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To put into rhyme.
verb
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To compose in metrical form with rhymes.
verb
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To use as a rhyme or rhymes.
verb
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(countable, uncountable) Rhyming verse (poetic form)

Many editors say they don't want stories written in rhyme.

noun
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A thought expressed in verse; a verse; a poem; a tale told in verse.

Tennyson's rhymes.

noun
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(countable) A word that rhymes with another.
  • (countable, in particular) A word that rhymes with another, in that it is pronounced identically with the other word from the vowel in its stressed syllable to the end.
    "Awake" is a rhyme for "lake".

Norse poetry is littered with rhymes like "sól ... sunnan".

Rap makes use of rhymes such as "money ... honey" and "nope ... dope".

noun
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(uncountable) Rhyming: sameness of sound of part of some words.

The poem exhibits a peculiar form of rhyme.

noun
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(countable, uncountable) Rhyming verse (poetic form).
noun
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(linguistics) Rime.
noun
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Such verse or poetry in general.
noun
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Full rhyme, perfect rhyme, exact rhyme, true rhyme.
hyponyms
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(intransitive) To compose or treat in verse; versify.
verb
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(followed by with) Of a word, to be pronounced identically with another from the vowel in its stressed syllable to the end.

"Creation" rhymes with "integration" and "station".

verb
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(reciprocal) Of two or more words, to be pronounced identically from the vowel in the stressed syllable of each to the end of each.

"Mug" and "rug" rhyme.

"India" and "windier" rhyme with each other in non-rhotic accents.

verb
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To put words together so that they rhyme.

I rewrote it to make it rhyme.

verb
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Rhyme is a poem composed of lines with similar ending sounds.

An example of rhyme is the childrens' poem "Humpty Dumpty."

noun
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To compose rhymes or verse.
verb
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To make use of rhymes in composing verse.
verb
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To put into rhyme or compose with rhymes.
verb
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To use (a word or words) as a rhyme.
verb
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A piece of verse, or poem, in which there is a regular recurrence of corresponding sounds, esp. at the ends of lines.
noun
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rhyme or reason
  • order or sense
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of rhyme

  • Alteration (influenced by rhythm) of Middle English rime from Old French of Germanic origin ar- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The noun derives from Middle English ryme, rime (“number, rhyme, verse"), from Old English rÄ«m (“number, counting, reckoning, calendar, numeral, sum, aggregate, value, enumeration, series"), from Proto-Germanic *rÄ«mÄ… (“calculation, number"), from Proto-Indo-European *hâ‚‚rey- (“to regulate, count"). Cognate with Old Frisian rÄ«m (“number, amount, tale"), Old High German rÄ«m (“series, row, number"), Old Norse rím (“calculation, calendar"), Middle Low German rÄ«m (“rhyme"), Dutch rijm (“rhyme"), German Reim (“rhyme"), Swedish rim (“rhyme"), Icelandic rím (“rhyme"), Old Irish rÄ«m (“number"), Welsh rhif (“number"), Ancient Greek ἀριθμός (arithmós, “number"). Meaning influenced in Middle English by Old French rime (“rhyme"), from the same Germanic source.

    From Wiktionary

  • The spelling has been influenced by an incorrectly assumed relationship with rhythm.

    From Wiktionary