Song meaning

sông, sŏng
Frequency:
The definition of a song is a musical piece, or the sounds of some animals such as birds.

An example of songs are "Silent Night," "Unchained Melody" and "I Can't Help Falling in Love with You."

noun
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A Chinese dynasty (960–1279). Its rule was marked by economic prosperity, technological innovation, and a flourishing of art and culture.
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Something that cost only a little; chiefly in for a song.

He bought that car for a song.

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A distinctive or characteristic sound made by an animal, such as a bird or an insect.
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The act or art of singing.

To break into song.

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A piece of music sung or composed for singing.
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A musical sound like singing.

The song of the lark.

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Song of Solomon.
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A musical composition with lyrics for voice or voices, performed by singing.

Thomas listened to his favorite song on the radio yesterday.

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(by extension) Any musical composition.
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Poetical composition; poetry; verse.
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The act or art of singing.
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A melodious sound made by a bird, insect, whale or other animal.

I love hearing the song of canary birds.

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An object of derision; a laughing stock.
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A former dynasty in China, reigning from the end of the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms to the beginning of the Yuan.
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A former empire in China, occupying the eastern half of modern China.
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The era of Chinese history during which the dynasty reigned.
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for a song
  • At a low price:.
    Bought the antique tray for a song.
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for a song
  • For very little money; cheap.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of song

  • Mandarin Sòng named by its founder Zhao Kuangyin after Sòng the medieval prefecture where the title of emperor was conferred upon him and where his army was located at the time (roughly the region around modern Shangqiu in Henan province) from Middle Chinese səwŋ`

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English sang sengwh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English song, sang, from Old English song, sang (“noise, song, singing, chanting; poetry; a poem to be sung or recited, psalm, lay"), from Proto-Germanic *sangwaz (“singing, song"), from Proto-Indo-European *sengÊ·h- (“to sing"). Cognate with Scots sang, song (“singing, song"), Saterland Frisian Song (“song"), West Frisian sang (“song"), Dutch zang (“song"), Low German sang (“song"), German Sang (“singing, song"), Swedish sÃ¥ng (“song"), Norwegian song (“song"), Icelandic söngur (“song"), Ancient Greek ὁμφή (omphḗ, “voice, oracle"). More at sing.

    From Wiktionary