Degree meaning

dĭ-grē'
The definition of a degree is any series of steps, a point in a scale or a stage in a scale.

An example of degree is the first step in a science project.

An example of degree is 98.6 for the human normal body temperature.

An example of degree is a high level of strength in an exercise regime.

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One of a series of steps in a process, course, or progression; a stage.

Proceeded to the next degree of difficulty.

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One of the seven notes of a diatonic scale.
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A step in a direct hereditary line of descent or ascent.

First cousins are two degrees from their common ancestor.

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Relative social or official rank, dignity, or position.
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Relative intensity or amount, as of a quality or attribute.

A high degree of accuracy.

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The extent or measure of a state of being, an action, or a relation.

Modernized their facilities to a large degree.

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A unit division of a temperature scale.
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A planar unit of angular measure equal in magnitude to1360 of a complete revolution.
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A unit of latitude or longitude, equal to1360 of a great circle.
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A division or classification of a specific crime according to its seriousness.

Murder in the second degree.

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A classification of the severity of an injury, especially a burn.

A third-degree burn.

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One of the forms used in the comparison of adjectives and adverbs. For example, tall is the positive degree, taller the comparative degree, and tallest the superlative degree of the adjective tall.
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The greatest sum of the exponents of the variables in a term of a polynomial or polynomial equation.
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The exponent of the derivative of highest order in a differential equation in standard form.
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An academic title given by a college or university to a student who has completed a course of study.

Received the Bachelor of Arts degree at commencement.

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A similar title conferred as an honorary distinction.
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A space or line of the staff.
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Any of the successive steps or stages in a process or series.
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A step in the direct line of descent.

A cousin in the second degree.

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Social or official rank, position, or class.

A man of low degree.

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Relative condition; manner, respect, or relation.

Each contributing to victory in his degree.

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Extent, amount, or relative intensity.

Hungry to a slight degree, burns of the third degree.

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Rank as determined by the sum of a term's exponents.

The terms a3c2 and x5 are of the fifth degree.

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A rank given by a college or university to a student who has completed a required course of study, or to a distinguished person as an honor.
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A grade of comparison of adjectives and adverbs.

The positive degree is “good,” the comparative degree is “better,” and the superlative degree is “best”

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The seriousness of a crime.

Murder in the first degree.

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A unit of measure for angles or arcs, one 360th part of the circumference of a circle: the measure of an angle is the number of degrees between its sides considered as radii of a circle.

A right angle has 90 degrees.

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The relative position of a note within a given scale.

B is the second degree in the scale of A.

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A unit of measure on a scale, as for temperature.
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A line marking a degree, as on a thermometer.
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A unit of measure on a temperature scale.
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One of a series of steps in a process, course, or progression; a stage.
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A classification of the severity of an injury, especially a burn.
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A unit division of a temperature scale.
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The greatest sum of the exponents of the variables in a term of a polynomial or polynomial equation. For example, x3 + 2 xy + x is of the third degree.
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A unit for measuring an angle or an arc of a circle. One degree is1 /360 of the circumference of a circle.
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This unit used to measure latitude or longitude on the Earth's surface.
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A step or level in the accomplishment of an act or a duty, or in the determination of a relationship. The level of an offense, such as murder and determining the appropriate punishment for it.
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The standard to which a party is responsible for exercising a duty or responsibility in order to avoid an implication of negligence.
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An individual step, or stage, in any process or scale of values. [from 13th c.]
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A stage of rank or privilege; social standing. [from 13th c.]
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(genealogy) A ‘step’ in genealogical descent. [from 14th c.]
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(now rare) One's relative state or experience; way, manner. [from 14th c.]
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The amount that an entity possesses a certain property; relative intensity, extent. [from 14th c.]

To what degree do the two accounts of the accident concur?

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A stage of proficiency or qualification in a course of study, now especially an award bestowed by a university or, in some countries, a college, as a certification of academic achievement. (In the United States, can include secondary schools.) [from 14th c.]

She has two bachelor's degrees and is studying towards a master's degree.

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(geometry) A unit of measurement of angle equal to 1/360 of a circle's circumference. [from 14th c.]

A right angle is a ninety degree angle.

Most humans have a field of vision of almost 180 degrees.

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(physics) A unit of measurement of temperature on any of several scales, such as Celsius or Fahrenheit. [from 18th c.]

90 degrees Fahrenheit is equivalent to 32.2 degrees Celsius.

Water boils at 100 degrees Celsius.

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(mathematics) The sum of the exponents of a term; the order of a polynomial. [from 18th c.]
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(graph theory) The number of edges that a vertex takes part in; a valency.
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(surveying) The curvature of a circular arc, expressed as the angle subtended by a fixed length of arc or chord.
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Origin of degree

Middle English degre from Old French from Vulgar Latin dēgradus Latin dē- de- Latin gradus step ghredh- in Indo-European roots