Pitch meaning

pĭch
Pitch is a black sticky substance that is left over after the distillation process of many substances.

An example of pitch is the tar that is used in roofing.

noun
19
5
Pitch means to throw something.

An example of pitch is a baseball being tossed at a bat.

verb
17
5
Any of various thick, dark, sticky substances obtained from the distillation residue of coal tar, wood tar, or petroleum and used for waterproofing, roofing, caulking, and paving.
noun
14
8
Pitch is defined as to set something up.

An example of pitch is putting up a tent.

verb
12
6
Any of various natural bitumens, such as mineral pitch or asphalt.
noun
6
6
Advertisement
A resin derived from the sap of various coniferous trees, as the pines.
noun
3
1
To determine or set the key of (a tune, an instrument, or the voice)
verb
1
0
To fall or plunge headlong.
verb
1
0
To plunge or toss with the bow and stern rising and falling abruptly.
verb
1
0
To set up; erect.

Pitch a tent.

verb
1
1
Advertisement
To erect or establish; set up.

Pitched a tent; pitch camp.

verb
0
0
To set firmly; implant; embed.

Pitched stakes in the ground.

verb
0
0
Any of various synthetic substances having pitchlike properties.
noun
0
0
To cover or smear with or as with pitch.
verb
0
0
To throw; cast, fling, or toss.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To set in order for battle.
verb
0
0
To fix or set at a particular point, level, degree, etc.
verb
0
0
To try to sell, promote, or convince, using persuasive talk, advertising, etc.
verb
0
0
To loft (a ball), esp. in making an approach.
verb
0
0
To encamp.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To take up one's position; settle.
verb
0
0
To hurl or toss anything, as hay, a baseball, etc.
verb
0
0
To incline downward; dip.
verb
0
0
To move in a like manner in the air.
verb
0
0
To plunge forward; lurch, as when off balance.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To act as pitcher in a ballgame.
verb
0
0
To loft a golf ball, as in making an approach.
verb
0
0
Act or manner of pitching.
noun
0
0
A throw, fling, toss, etc.
noun
0
0
Anything pitched.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
The amount pitched.
noun
0
0
A point or degree.

Emotion was at a high pitch.

noun
0
0
The degree of slope or inclination.
noun
0
0
A card game of the all-fours family in which the suit of the first card led becomes trump.
noun
0
0
The slope of the sides of a roof, expressed by the ratio of its height to its span.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
The dip of a stratum or vein.
noun
0
0
A short, lofted shot, usually to the green.
noun
0
0
A thick, tarlike substance obtained by distilling coal tar, used for roofing, waterproofing, and paving.
0
0
Any of various natural bitumens, such as asphalt, having similar uses.
0
0
A resin derived from the sap of a cone-bearing tree, such as a pine.
0
0
Advertisement
The number of printed characters per inch. With proportionally spaced characters, the pitch is variable and must be measured as an average. See dot pitch and pitch-yaw-roll.
0
0
A sticky, gummy substance secreted by trees; sap.

It is hard to get this pitch off of my hand.

noun
0
0
A dark, extremely viscous material remaining in still after distilling crude oil and tar.

They put pitch on the mast to protect it. The barrel was sealed with pitch.

It was pitch black because there was no moon.

noun
0
0
(geology) Pitchstone.
noun
0
0
To cover or smear with pitch.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
To darken; to blacken; to obscure.
verb
0
0
A throw; a toss; a cast, as of something from the hand.

A good pitch in quoits.

noun
0
0
(baseball) The act of pitching a baseball.

The pitch was low and inside.

noun
0
0
(sports) The field on which cricket, soccer, rugby or field hockey is played. In cricket, the pitch is in the centre of the field; see cricket pitch.

The teams met on the pitch.

noun
0
0
An effort to sell or promote something.

He gave me a sales pitch.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
The distance between evenly spaced objects, e.g. the teeth of a saw, the turns of a screw thread, or letters in a monospace font.

The pitch of pixels on the point scale is 72 pixels per inch.

The pitch of this saw is perfect for that type of wood.

noun
0
0
The angle at which an object sits.

The pitch of the roof or haystack.

noun
0
0
More specifically, the rotation angle about the transverse axis.
noun
0
0
A level or degree.
noun
0
0
(aviation) A measure of the degree to which an aircraft's nose tilts up or down.

The pitch of an aircraft.

noun
0
0
(aviation) A measure of the angle of attack of a propeller.

The propellor blades' pitch.

noun
0
0
(nautical) The measure of extent to which a nautical vessel rotates on its athwartships axis, causing its bow and stern to go up and down. Compare with roll, yaw and heave.
noun
0
0
The place where a busker performs.
noun
0
0
An area in a market (similar) allocated to a particular trader.
noun
0
0
A point or peak; the extreme point or degree of elevation or depression; hence, a limit or bound.
noun
0
0
(climbing) A section of a climb or rock face; specifically, the climbing distance between belays or stances.
noun
0
0
(caving) A vertical cave passage, only negotiable by using rope or ladders.

The entrance pitch requires 30 metres of rope.

noun
0
0
(now UK regional) A person or animal's height.

noun
0
0
That point of the ground on which the ball pitches or lights when bowled.
noun
0
0
A descent; a fall; a thrusting down.
noun
0
0
The point where a declivity begins; hence, the declivity itself; a descending slope; the degree or rate of descent or slope; slant.

A steep pitch in the road; the pitch of a roof.

noun
0
0
(mining) The limit of ground set to a miner who receives a share of the ore taken out.
noun
0
0
(engineering) The distance from centre to centre of any two adjacent teeth of gearing, measured on the pitch line; called also circular pitch.
noun
0
0
The length, measured along the axis, of a complete turn of the thread of a screw, or of the helical lines of the blades of a screw propeller.
noun
0
0
The distance between the centres of holes, as of rivet holes in boiler plates.
noun
0
0
To throw.

He pitched the horseshoe.

verb
0
0
(intransitive, baseball) To throw (the ball) toward home plate.

The hurler pitched a curveball.

(intransitive) He pitched high and inside.

verb
0
0
(intransitive, baseball) To play baseball in the position of pitcher.

Bob pitches today.

verb
0
0
To throw away; discard.

He pitched the candy wrapper.

verb
0
0
To promote, advertise, or attempt to sell.

He pitched the idea for months with no takers.

verb
0
0
To deliver in a certain tone or style, or with a certain audience in mind.

At which level should I pitch my presentation?

verb
0
0
To assemble or erect (a tent).

Pitch the tent over there.

verb
0
0
(intransitive) To fix or place a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp.
verb
0
0
(intransitive, aviation or nautical) To move so that the front of an aircraft or ship goes alternatively up and down.

The typhoon pitched the deck of the ship.

(intransitive) The airplane pitched.

verb
0
0
(golf) To play a short, high, lofty shot that lands with backspin.

The only way to get on the green from here is to pitch the ball over the bunker.

verb
0
0
(intransitive, cricket) To bounce on the playing surface.

The ball pitched well short of the batsman.

verb
0
0
(intransitive, Bristolian, of snow) To settle and build up, without melting.
verb
0
0
To alight; to settle; to come to rest from flight.
verb
0
0
To fix one's choice; with on or upon.
verb
0
0
To plunge or fall; especially, to fall forward; to decline or slope.

To pitch from a precipice.

The vessel pitches in a heavy sea.

The field pitches toward the east.

verb
0
0
To set, face, or pave with rubble or undressed stones, as an embankment or a roadway.

verb
0
0
To set or fix, as a price or value.

verb
0
0
(music) The perceived frequency of a sound or note.

The pitch of middle "C" is familiar to many musicians.

noun
0
0
(music) In an a cappella group, the singer responsible for singing a note for the other members to tune themselves by.

Bob, our pitch, let out a clear middle "C" and our conductor gave the signal to start.

noun
0
0
To produce a note of a given pitch.
verb
0
0
To fix or set the tone of.

To pitch a tune.

verb
0
0
To smear or cover with pitch.
verb
0
1
To set at a specified downward slant.

Pitched the roof at a steep angle.

verb
0
1
To attempt to promote or sell, often in a high-pressure manner.
verb
0
1
To hit (a golf ball) in a high arc with backspin so that it does not roll very far after striking the ground.
verb
0
1
To throw or toss something, such as a ball, horseshoe, or bale.
verb
0
1
To play in the position of pitcher.
verb
0
1
To plunge headlong.

He pitched over the railing.

verb
0
1
To slope downward.

The hill pitches steeply.

verb
0
1
To set up living quarters; encamp; settle.
verb
0
1
To hit a golf ball in a high arc with backspin so that it does not roll very far after striking the ground.
verb
0
1
The act or an instance of pitching.
noun
0
1
A playing field.
noun
0
1
A level or degree, as of intensity.

Worked at a feverish pitch.

noun
0
1
The distance that a propeller would travel in an ideal medium during one complete revolution, measured parallel to the shaft of the propeller.
noun
0
1
The stand of a vendor or hawker.
noun
0
1
The density of characters in a printed line, usually expressed as characters per inch.
noun
0
1
A black, sticky substance formed in the distillation of coal tar, wood tar, petroleum, etc. and used for waterproofing, roofing, pavements, etc.
noun
0
1
Any of certain bitumens, as asphalt, asphaltite, etc.
noun
0
1
A resin found in certain evergreen trees.
noun
0
1
A line of talk, such as a salesperson uses to persuade customers.
noun
0
1
in there pitching
  • Working hard and enthusiastically.
idiom
0
0
make a pitch for
  • To speak in favor or promotion of.
idiom
0
0
pitch in
  • To set to work energetically.
  • To make a contribution.
idiom
0
0
pitch into
  • To attack physically or verbally.
  • To set to work on energetically.
idiom
0
0
pitch on
  • To select; decide on.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

in there pitching
make a pitch for

Origin of pitch

  • Middle English pich from Old English pic and from Anglo-Norman piche both from Latin pix pic-

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English pichen probably from Old English piccean causative of *pīcian to prick

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English piÄ‹, from Latin pÄ«x. Cognate with Dutch pek, German Pech.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English pitch (“to thrust in, fasten, settle"), from Old English

    From Wiktionary

  • Unknown

    From Wiktionary