Descend meaning

dĭ-sĕnd
To lower oneself; stoop.
verb
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To move from a higher to a lower place; come or go down.
verb
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To slope, extend, or incline downward.
verb
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To proceed or progress downward, as in rank, pitch, or scale.

Titles listed in descending order of importance; notes that descended to the lower register.

verb
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To descend is defined as to go downward, to become lower in pitch, reaching an undesirable state or can refer to a surprise attack or unwelcome visit.

An example of descend is when a plane starts to move down or descend before landing.

An example of descend is when a hill goes in a downward direction.

An example of descend is when a musician starts to lower his voice and sing deeper notes.

An example of descend is when you slip into being insane.

An example of descend is when a party gets out of control and turns into chaos.

An example of descend is when your in-laws show up at your house for a surprise visit.

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To extend or proceed downward along.

A road that descended the mountain in sharp curves.

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To arrive or attack in a sudden or overwhelming manner.

Summer tourists descending on the seashore village.

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To move from a higher to lower part of; go down.

I descended the staircase into the basement.

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To move from a higher to a lower place; come down or go down.
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To pass from an earlier to a later time, from greater to less, from general to particular, etc.
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To slope or extend downward.
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To come down (from a source, as from an ancestor)

He is descended from pioneers.

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To pass by inheritance or heredity.

The estate descended to the nephew.

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To lower oneself or stoop (to some act)
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To make a sudden attack, raid, or visit (on or upon)
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(astron.) To move toward the horizon.
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(music) To move down the scale.
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To move, step, or pass down or down along.
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(intransitive) To pass from a higher to a lower place; to move downwards; to come or go down in any way, as by falling, flowing, walking, etc.; to plunge; to fall; to incline downward.

The rain descended, and the floods came. Matthew vii. 25.

We will here descend to matters of later date. Fuller.

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(intransitive, poetic) To enter mentally; to retire.

[He] with holiest meditations fed, Into himself descended. John Milton.

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(intransitive, with on or upon) To make an attack, or incursion, as if from a vantage ground; to come suddenly and with violence.

And on the suitors let thy wrath descend. Alexander Pope.

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(intransitive) To come down to a lower, less fortunate, humbler, less virtuous, or worse, state or station; to lower or abase one's self.

He descended from his high estate.

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(intransitive) To pass from the more general or important to the particular or less important matters to be considered.
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(intransitive) To come down, as from a source, original, or stock; to be derived; to proceed by generation or by transmission; to fall or pass by inheritance.

The beggar may descend from a prince.

A crown descends to the heir.

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(intransitive, anatomy) To move toward the south, or to the southward.
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(intransitive, music) To fall in pitch; to pass from a higher to a lower tone.
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To go down upon or along; to pass from a higher to a lower part of.

They descended the river in boats; to descend a ladder.

But never tears his cheek descended. Byron.

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be descended from
  • To be related to (an ancestor) by genetic descent from an individual or individuals in a previous generation:
    She claims to be descended from European royalty.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

be descended from

Origin of descend

  • Middle English descenden from Old French descendre from Latin dēscendere dē- de- scandere to climb skand- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English decenden, from Old French descendre, from Latin descendere, past participle descensus (“to come down, go down, fall, sink”), from de- (“down”) + scandere (“to climb”). See scan, scandent. Compare ascend, condescend, transcend.

    From Wiktionary