Condescend meaning

kŏndĭ-sĕnd
To condescend is to talk to someone in a way that makes it clear you believe that you are better and smarter.

An example of condescend is if you explain something to an adult with slow, deliberate words as if you were talking to a child.

verb
11
3
To deal with others in a proud or haughty way.
verb
8
3
To descend voluntarily to the level, regarded as lower, of the person one is dealing with; be graciously willing to do something regarded as beneath one's dignity; deign.
verb
7
3
(intransitive) To come down from one's superior position; to deign (to do something).
verb
7
3
To do something that one regards as beneath one's social rank or dignity; lower oneself.
verb
4
3
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To behave in a patronizing or superior manner toward someone.

Viewed as a popularizer more than a scholar, he was condescended to by his academic colleagues.

verb
3
2
(obs.) To make concessions; agree; assent.
verb
2
1
(intransitive) To treat (someone) as though inferior; to be patronizing (toward someone); to talk down (to someone).
verb
2
1
1868, Horatio Alger, Struggling Upward, ch. 3.

"This is the pay I get for condescending to let you go with me."

verb
1
1

Origin of condescend

  • Middle English condescenden from Old French condescendre from Late Latin condēscendere Latin com- intensive pref. com– dēscendere to descend descend

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English condescenden, from Old French condescendre, from Late Latin condescendere (“to let one's self down, stoop, condescend”), from Latin com- (“together”) + descendere (“to come down”); see descend.

    From Wiktionary