Traverse meaning

trə-vûrs, trăvərs
To look over carefully; examine.
verb
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To extend across; cross.

A bridge that traverses a river.

verb
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To go counter to; thwart.
verb
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Traverse means to move back and forth, cross over or examine carefully.

An example of traverse is a performer walking across a tightrope.

An example of traverse is doing a land survey.

verb
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To cause to move laterally on a pivot; swivel.

Traverse an artillery piece.

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To survey by traverse.
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To brace (a yard) fore and aft.
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To move to the side or back and forth.
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To turn laterally; swivel.
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A passing across, over, or through.
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A route or path across or over.
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Something that lies across, especially:
  • An intersecting line; a transversal.
  • A structural crosspiece; a transom.
  • A gallery, deck, or loft crossing from one side of a building to the other.
  • A railing, curtain, screen, or similar barrier.
  • A defensive barrier across a rampart or trench, as a bank of earth thrown up to protect against enfilade fire.
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Something that obstructs and thwarts; an obstacle.
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The zigzag route of a vessel forced by contrary winds to sail on different courses.
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A zigzag or diagonal course on a steep slope, as in skiing.
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A line established by sighting in surveying a tract of land.
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A formal denial of the opposing party's allegation of fact in a lawsuit.
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Lying or extending across; transverse.
adjective
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To go counter to; oppose; thwart.
verb
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To survey, inspect, or examine carefully.
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To turn (a gun, lathe, etc.) laterally; swivel.
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To make a traverse of in surveying.
verb
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To move across; cross over.
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To move back and forth over a place, etc.; cross and recross.
verb
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To swivel or pivot.
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To move across a mountain slope, as in skiing, in an oblique direction.
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To make a traverse in surveying.
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To move one's blade toward the opponent's hilt while pressing one's foil hard against the opponent's foil.
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Something that traverses or crosses.
  • A line that intersects others.
  • A crossbar, crosspiece, crossbeam, transom, etc.
  • A parapet or wall of earth, etc. across a rampart or trench.
  • A gallery, loft, etc. crossing a building.
  • A single line of survey across a plot, region, etc.
  • A screen, curtain, etc. placed crosswise.
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Something that opposes or thwarts; obstacle.
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The act or an instance of traversing.
  • A passing across or through; crossing.
  • A lateral, pivoting, oblique, or zigzagging movement.
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A part, device, etc. that causes a traversing movement.
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A passage by which one may cross; way across.
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A formal denial in a lawsuit.
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Passing or extending across; transverse.
adjective
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Designating or of drapes (and the rods and hooks for them) usually hung in pairs that can be drawn together or apart by pulling a cord at the side.
adjective
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Across; crosswise.
adverb
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A pleading in common law denying an allegation of fact in an adversary’s pleading or contesting that the adversary lacked adequate knowledge to make such an allegation in the first place. See also denial.
noun
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A flat denial of all of the allegations in the pleadings of one’s adversary.
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A denial of one alleged fact that is not absolute, but that seeks to explain it away or qualify it by virtue of special circumstances, such as an inducement that can be verified.
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(climbing) A route used in mountaineering, specifically rock climbing, in which the descent occurs by a different route than the ascent.
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(military) In fortification, a mass of earth or other material employed to protect troops against enfilade. It is constructed at right angles to the parapet.
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(surveying) A series of points, with angles and distances measured between, traveled around a subject, usually for use as "control" i.e. angular reference system for later surveying work.
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F. Beaumont.

At the entrance of the king, / The first traverse was drawn.

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Something that thwarts or obstructs.

He would have succeeded, had it not been for unlucky traverses not under his control.

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(architecture) A gallery or loft of communication from side to side of a church or other large building.

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(law) A formal denial of some matter of fact alleged by the opposite party in any stage of the pleadings. The technical words introducing a traverse are absque hoc ("without this", i.e. without what follows).
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(nautical) The zigzag course or courses made by a ship in passing from one place to another; a compound course.
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(geometry) A line lying across a figure or other lines; a transversal.
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(firearms) The turning of a gun so as to make it point in any desired direction.
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To travel across, often under difficult conditions.

He will have to traverse the mountain to get to the other side.

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(computing) To visit all parts of; to explore thoroughly.

To traverse all nodes in a network.

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(artillery) To rotate a gun around a vertical axis to bear upon a military target.

To traverse a cannon.

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(climbing) To climb or descend a steep hill at a wide angle.
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To lay in a cross direction; to cross.
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To cross by way of opposition; to thwart with obstacles; to obstruct.
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To pass over and view; to survey carefully.
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(carpentry) To plane in a direction across the grain of the wood.

To traverse a board.

verb
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(law) To deny formally.
verb
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adverb
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Lying across; being in a direction across something else.

Paths cut with traverse trenches.

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Traverse is defined as something that lies across or crosses over.

An example of a traverse is a zigzag route down a steep hill taken by a skier.

An example of a traverse is a log laying across a road.

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Origin of traverse

  • Middle English traversen from Old French traverser from Vulgar Latin trāversāre from Late Latin trānsversāre from Latin trānsversus transverse transverse

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin trans across + versus turned, perfect passive participle of vertere, turn

    From Wiktionary