Wall meaning

wôl
Frequency:
The definition of a wall is something that divides or supports.

An example of a wall is the four sides to a closed off room in a house.

An example of a wall is the border that formally split Berlin into east and west sides.

An example of a wall is a person being closed off from their emotions.

noun
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To confine or seal behind a wall; immure.
verb
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A structure of stonework, cement, or other material built to retain a flow of water.
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A continuous structure of masonry or other material forming a rampart and built for defensive purposes.
noun
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To divide or separate with or as if with a wall. Often used with off:

Wall off half a room.

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To block or close (an opening or passage, for example) with or as if with a wall.
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An upright structure of wood, stone, brick, etc., serving to enclose, divide, support, or protect.
  • Such a structure forming a side or inner partition of a building.
  • Such a continuous structure serving to enclose an area, to separate fields, etc.
  • Such a structure used as a military defense; fortification.
  • Such a structure used to hold back water; levee; dike.
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Something resembling a wall in appearance or function, as the side or inside surface of a container or body cavity.
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Something suggestive of a wall in that it holds back, divides, hides, etc.

A wall of secrecy.

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Of or along a wall.
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Placed or growing on, in, or against a wall.
adjective
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To close up (an opening) with a wall.
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A part of a structure that encloses a cavity, chamber, or other anatomical unit.
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A rampart of earth, stones etc. built up for defensive purposes.
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A structure built for defense surrounding a city, castle etc.

The town wall was surrounded by a moat.

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Each of the substantial structures acting either as the exterior of or divisions within a structure.

We're adding another wall in this room during the remodeling.

The wind blew against the walls of the tent.

noun
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A point of desperation.
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A point of defeat or extinction.
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An impediment to free movement.

A wall of police officers met the protesters before they reached the capitol steps.

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A type of butterfly (Lasiommata megera).
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(often in combination) A barrier.

A seawall, a firewall.

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A barrier to vision.
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Something with the apparent solidity and dimensions of a building wall.

A wall of sound, a wall of water.

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(anatomy, zoology, botany) A divisive or containing structure in an organ or cavity.
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(auction) A fictional bidder used to increase the price at an auction. Also called a chandelier.
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(soccer) A line of defenders set up between an opposing free-kick taker and the goal.
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(Internet) A personal notice board listing messages of interest to a particular user.
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To enclose with a wall.

He walled the study with books.

verb
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(with "in") To enclose by surrounding with walls.

They had walled in the garden.

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(with "off") To separate with a wall.

The previous owners had walled off two rooms, making an apartment.

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(with "up") To seal with a wall.

They walled up the basement space that had been used as a coal bin.

verb
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To boil.
verb
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To well, as water; spring.
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(chiefly dialectal) A spring of water.
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(nautical) A kind of knot often used at the end of a rope; a wall knot or wale.
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An upright structure of masonry, wood, plaster, or other building material serving to enclose, divide, or protect an area, especially a vertical construction forming an inner partition or exterior siding of a building.
noun
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(sports) The vertical surface of an ocean wave in surfing.
noun
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To enclose, surround, or fortify with or as if with a wall.

Wall up an old window.

verb
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To furnish, line, enclose, divide, protect, etc. with or as with a wall or walls.

To wall a room with books, to wall off the old wing, a mind walled in by fears.

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(slang) off the wall
  • Extremely unconventional.
  • Without foundation; ridiculous:
    An accusation that is really off the wall.
idiom
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(slang) up the wall
  • Into a state of extreme frustration, anger, or distress:
    Tensions that are driving me up the wall.
idiom
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writing
  • An ominous indication of the course of future events:
    Saw the writing on the wall and fled the country.
idiom
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drive to the wall
  • to place in a desperate or extreme position
idiom
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drive up the wall
  • to make frantic, emotionally tense, crazy, etc.
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go to the wall
  • to be forced to retreat or yield in a conflict; suffer defeat
  • to fail in business; become bankrupt
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hit the wall
  • to come to a point beyond which there is no further progress
    To hit the wall after four years of steady profits.
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(slang) off the wall
  • unsound of mind; crazy
  • very eccentric or unconventional
idiom
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(see) the handwriting (or writing) on the wall
  • (to foresee) impending disaster or misfortune: Dan. 5:5-28
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

drive to the wall
drive up the wall
(see) the handwriting (<i>or</i> writing) on the wall

Origin of wall

  • Middle English from Old English weall from Latin vallum palisade from vallus stake Idiom, in reference to an incident in the Bible (Daniel 5) in which a hand writes mysterious words on the wall of Belshazzar's banquet hall and the prophet Daniel interprets them as predicting the king's downfall

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English wall, from Old English weall (“wall, dike, earthwork, rampart, dam, rocky shore, cliff"), from Proto-Germanic *wallaz, *wallÄ… (“wall, rampart, entrenchment"), from Latin vallum (“wall, rampart, entrenchment, palisade"), from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (“to turn, wind, roll"). Cognate with North Frisian wal (“wall"), Dutch wal (“wall, rampart, embankment"), German Wall (“rampart, mound, embankment"), Swedish vall (“mound, wall, bank"). More at wallow, walk.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English wallen, from Old English weallian (“to bubble, boil"), from Proto-Germanic *wallōnÄ…, *wellōnÄ… (“to fount, stream, boil"), from Proto-Indo-European *welǝn-, *welǝm- (“wave"). Cognate with Middle Dutch wallen (“to boil, bubble"), Dutch wellen (“to weld"), German wellen (“to wave, warp"), Danish vælde (“to overwhelm"), Swedish välla (“to gush, weld"). See also well.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English walle, from Old English *weall (“spring"), from Proto-Germanic *wallô, *wallaz (“well, spring"). See above. Cognate with Old Frisian walla (“spring"), Old English wiell (“well").

    From Wiktionary