Boil meaning

boil
To be stirred up or greatly excited, especially in anger.

The mere idea made me boil.

verb
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The definition of boil is the act of becoming very angry or changing from liquid to gas, or a boil is a swelling on the skin full of pus.

An example of a boil is the placing of water on the stove until it bubbles in the pot.

An example of a boil is a huge sore on the body.

noun
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Boil means to change or be changed from a liquid to a gas, or to get very mad.

An example of to boil is to put water on the stove until it starts to bubble.

An example of to boil is to become enraged at an accident.

verb
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To be in a state of agitation; seethe.

A river boiling over the rocks.

verb
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To cook or clean by boiling.
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To separate by evaporation in the process of boiling.

Boil the maple sap.

verb
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The condition or act of boiling.
noun
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A picnic featuring shrimp, crab, or crayfish boiled in large pots with spices, and then shelled and eaten by hand.
noun
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An agitated, swirling, roiling mass of liquid.
noun
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A painful, circumscribed pus-filled inflammation of the skin and subcutaneous tissue usually caused by a local staphylococcal infection.
noun
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To bubble up and vaporize over direct heat.
verb
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To reach the vaporizing stage.
verb
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To seethe or churn like a boiling liquid.
verb
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To be agitated, as with rage.
verb
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To cook in boiling water or other liquid.
verb
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To heat to the boiling point.
verb
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To cook, process, or separate in boiling water or other liquid.
verb
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The act or state of boiling.
noun
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A painful, circumscribed pus-filled inflammation of the skin and subcutaneous tissue usually caused by a staphylococcal infection.
noun
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To change from a liquid to a gaseous state by being heated to the boiling point and being provided with sufficient energy. Boiling is an example of a phase transition.
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A localized accumulation of pus in the skin, resulting from infection.
noun
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The point at which fluid begins to change to a vapour.

Add the noodles when the water comes to the boil.

noun
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A dish of boiled food, especially based on seafood.
noun
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(rare, nonstandard) The collective noun for a group of hawks.
noun
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To heat (a liquid) to the point where it begins to turn into a gas.

Boil some water in a pan.

verb
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(intransitive) To cook in boiling water.

Boil the eggs for two minutes.

Is the rice boiling yet?

verb
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(intransitive) Of a liquid, to begin to turn into a gas, seethe.

Pure water boils at 100 degrees Celsius.

verb
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(intransitive, informal, used only in progressive tenses) Said of weather being uncomfortably hot.

It’s boiling outside!

verb
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(intransitive, informal, used only in progressive tenses) To feel uncomfortably hot. See also seethe.

I’m boiling in here – could you open the window?

verb
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To form, or separate, by boiling or evaporation.

To boil sugar or salt.

verb
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To be agitated like boiling water; to bubble; to effervesce.

The boiling waves of the sea.

verb
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To be moved or excited with passion; to be hot or fervid.

His blood boils with anger.

verb
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An inflamed, painful, pus-filled swelling on the skin, caused by localized infection; furuncle.
noun
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boil away
  • To evaporate as a result of boiling.
idiom
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boil down
  • To lessen in quantity by boiling, esp. so as to change consistency.
  • To make more terse; condense; summarize.
idiom
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boil down to
  • To mean, when summarized; amount to.
    What it all boils down to is more unemployment.
idiom
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boil over
  • To come to a boil and spill over the rim.
  • To lose one's temper; get excited.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

boil away
boil down to

Origin of boil

  • Middle English boillen from Old French boillir from Latin bullīre from bulla bubble

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English bile from Old English bȳle

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English boillen, from Old French boillir (French: bouillir) from Latin bullīre, present active infinitive of bulliō (“I bubble, boil”), from bulla (“bubble”). Displaced native Middle English sethen "to boil" (from Old English sēoþan "to boil, seethe"), Middle English wellen "to boil, bubble" (from Old English wiellan "to bubble, boil"), Middle English wallen "to well up, boil" (from Old English weallan "to well up, boil"). More at seethe, well.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English bile, büle (“boil, tumor”), from Old English bȳl, bȳle (“boil, swelling”), from Proto-Germanic *būlijō, *būlō (“boil”). Akin to German Beule (“boil, hump”), Icelandic beyla (“swelling, hump”).

    From Wiktionary