Infuse meaning

ĭn-fyo͝oz
To steep or soak without boiling in order to extract soluble elements or active principles.
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To put into or introduce as if by pouring.

Infused new vigor into the movement.

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To fill or cause to be filled with something.

Infused them with a love of the land.

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To flavor or scent (a liquid) by steeping ingredients in it.
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To introduce (a solution) into the body through a vein for therapeutic purposes.
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(obs.) To pour (a liquid) in, into, or upon.
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To put (a substance) into.

Butter infused with garlic.

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To put (a quality, idea, etc.) into, as if by pouring; instill; impart.
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To fill (with a quality, feeling, etc.); imbue; inspire.
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To steep or soak (tea leaves, etc.) so as to extract flavor or other qualities.
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To steep or soak without boiling in order to extract soluble elements or active principles.
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To introduce a solution into the body through a vein for therapeutic purposes.
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To cause to become an element of something; to insert or fill.
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To steep in a liquid, so as to extract the soluble constituents (usually medicinal or herbal).
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To inspire; to inspirit or animate; to fill (with).
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To instill as a quality.
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(intransitive) To undergo infusion.
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To make an infusion with (an ingredient); to tincture; to saturate.

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Infuse is defined as to steep, soak, implant or instill an idea.

An example of infuse is steeping tea leaves in boiling water.

An example of infuse is planting a seed in wet soil.

An example of infuse is teaching your child how to read.

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Origin of infuse

  • Middle English infusen from Old French infuser from Latin īnfundere īnfūs- in- in in–2 fundere to pour gheu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Latin [in]fu(n)do fu(n)dere fusi fusum: to pour.

    From Wiktionary