Introduce meaning

ĭntrə-do͝os, -dyo͝os
To provide (someone) with a beginning knowledge or first experience of something.

Introduced me to weightlifting.

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To put forward (a plan, for example) for consideration; propose.
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To put inside or into; insert or inject.

Introduced a catheter into an artery; introduced realism to crime fiction.

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To lead or bring into a given place or position; conduct in.
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To put in or within; insert.

To introduce an electric wire into a conduit.

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To bring or add as a new feature into some action, composition, etc.

To introduce a humorous note in a speech.

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To bring into use, knowledge, or fashion; make popular or common; institute.

Space science has introduced many new words.

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To offer (a new product) for sale.
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To bring forward; bring to notice formally.

To introduce a bill into Congress.

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To start; open; begin.

To introduce a talk with an anecdote.

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To introduce is defined as to present, put in, begin or bring in.

An example of to introduce is a co-worker meeting your wife for the first time.

An example of to introduce is adding coffee grounds to a compost mixture.

An example of to introduce is to start a speech with an overview of what you are going to be talking about.

An example of to introduce is bringing a friend to your favorite coffee shop.

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(of people) To cause (someone) to be acquainted (with someone else).

Let me introduce you to my friends.

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To make (something or someone) known by formal announcement or recommendation.

The senator plans to introduce the bill in the next session.

Let me introduce our guest speaker.

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To add (something) to a system, a mixture, or a container.

Various pollutants were introduced into the atmosphere.

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To bring (something) into practice.

Wheeled transport was introduced long ago.

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Origin of introduce

  • Middle English introducen to bring into from Latin intrōdūcere intrō- within en in Indo-European roots dūcere to lead deuk- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French, from Latin intrōdūcō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁énteros (“inner, what is inside”) and Proto-Indo-European *dewk-.

    From Wiktionary