Fragmentation meaning

frăgmən-tāshən, -mĕn-
The act or process of breaking into fragments.
noun
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(computers) The scattering of parts of a file or files throughout a storage device, as when the operating system breaks up the file and fits it into the spaces left vacant by previously deleted files.
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The scattering of the fragments of an exploding bomb or other projectile.
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The scattering of parts of a computer file across different regions of a disk. Fragmentation occurs when the operating system breaks up the file and stores it in locations left vacant by previously deleted files. The more fragmented the file, the slower it is to retrieve, since each piece of the file must be identified and located on the disk.
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Referring to the process by which a switch or router breaks up or divides a large datagram. If the receiving network cannot accommodate a datagram of a given total length, it must be fragmented.There must be some form of fragmentation control to ensure that the fragments can be re-associated when they exit the network and that the datagram can be reconstituted. In Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4), for example, fragmentation control requires that each fragment contain a copy of an identification PBX or Router Edge Office Voice or Data Terminals Access Line 2-Wire 2-Wire 4-Wire 4-Wire Switch Tandem Office Switch Edge Office Access Trunk Switch 4-Wire 4-Wire field and certain other fields in the header.The IPv4 header contains a fragment offset field that identifies where a fragment fits in the complete set of fragments that comprise the original datagram. This field is used to sequence the fragments correctly, as they may arrive at the destination device out of sequence. See also datagram, IPv4, IPv6, network, router, and switch.
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The definition of fragmentation is being broken down into sections.

An example of fragmentation is cutting a worm into pieces.

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Means that whatever had been whole now exists in parts—unattached and isolated from each other. Network traffic is typically fragmented into smaller pieces to fit into the physical constraints of the underlying network architecture. Though a completely normal behavior found in a network, fragmentation can be exploited by crackers. Because simpler firewalls and Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) look at only one packet of data at a time to decide whether to block data and alert system administrators or to let the packet pass, certain firewall and IDS rules do not “trigger” when data is split over several packets; thus, potentially dangerous traffic can get through the barriers. More modern versions of these protective systems reassemble the data before the rule set is applied. Accepting this fact, an additional problem arises from the reassembly of packets in the security devices; namely, different operating systems use different reassembly strategies. Crackers can exploit the knowledge about these differing algorithms by crafting packets so that the protective devices reassemble in such a way as to make the system vulnerable to attack. In the computer operating system software domain, there are two types of fragmentation: file fragmentation and free-space fragmentation. The former refers to computer disk files broken into scattered parts, whereas the latter indicates that the disk’s empty space is in scattered parts instead of existing as a whole in one large, empty space. File fragmentation causes difficulty in users’ ability to access data stored on computer disk files, whereas free-space fragmentation causes difficulty in users’ ability to create new data files or add to existing ones. Actually, fragmentation interferes with any users’ computing tasks because it slows down the computer. Executive.com. Introduction: Fragmentation. [Online, 2004.] Executive.com Website. http://www.executive.com/fragbook/intro.htm#frag_def.
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The act of fragmenting or something fragmented; disintegration.
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The process by which fragments of an exploding bomb scatter.
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(computing) The breaking up and dispersal of a file into non-contiguous areas of a disk.
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(computing) The breaking up of a data packet when larger than the transmission unit of a network.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
fragmentation
Plural:
fragmentations