Sort meaning

sôrt
Character or nature.

Books of a subversive sort.

noun
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To sort is to put things in order or group them into categories.

When you put all your white clothes together and all your dark clothes together, this is an example of a situation where you sort your clothes.

verb
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The definition of a sort is a particular kind of person, attitude or action that has a distinctive feature or characteristic.

A group of people who are kind are an example of a kind sort of people.

A person who is quiet is an example of a quiet sort of person.

noun
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To separate from others.

Sort the wheat from the chaff.

verb
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A group of persons or things of the same general character; a kind.
noun
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(intransitive) To join or associate with others, especially with others of the same kind or species; to agree.
verb
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One that exemplifies the characteristics of or serves a similar function to another.
noun
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A person; an individual.

The clerk is a decent sort.

noun
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An operation that arranges data in a specified way.

Did an alphabetic sort on the columns of data.

noun
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To place or arrange according to class, kind, or size; classify.

Sorted the books into boxes by genre.

verb
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To make a search or examination of a collection of things.

Sorted through the laundry looking for a matching sock.

verb
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To be or become arranged in a certain way.
verb
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Manner or way.
noun
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Any of the kinds of characters in a font of type.
noun
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To place, separate, or arrange according to class or kind.
verb
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To associate; consort.
verb
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To harmonize or agree; suit.
verb
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To arrange data or a group of records in a particular way, as chronologically or alphabetically, for more efficient access.
verb
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(1) To reorder data into a new sequence. See sorter, counting sort, bubble sort, quick sort and selection sort.
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noun
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Manner; form of being or acting.
noun
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(dated) Group, company.
noun
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(informal) A person.

This guy's a decent sort.

noun
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An act of sorting.

I had a sort of my cupboard.

noun
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(computing) An algorithm for sorting a list of items into a particular sequence.

Popular sorts include quicksort and heapsort.

noun
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(typography) A piece of metal type used to print one letter, character, or symbol in a particular size and style.
noun
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To separate according to certain criteria.
  • Isaac Newton.
    Rays which differ in refrangibility may be parted and sorted from one another.
verb
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To arrange into some order, especially numerically, alphabetically or chronologically.
verb
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(UK) To fix a problem, to handle a task; to sort out.
verb
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To conjoin; to put together in distribution; to class.
verb
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(intransitive) To suit; to fit; to be in accord; to harmonize.
verb
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Shakespeare.

I'll sort some other time to visit you.

verb
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A way of acting or behaving.
noun
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Any group of persons or things related by having something in common; kind; class.
noun
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Quality or type; nature.

Remarks of that sort.

noun
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The act or an instance of sorting.
noun
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after a sort
  • In a haphazard or imperfect way:.
    Managed to paint the chair after a sort.
idiom
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of sorts
  • Of a mediocre or inferior kind:.
    A constitutional government of a sort.
  • Of one kind or another:.
    Knew many folktales of sorts.
idiom
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out of sorts
  • Slightly ill.
  • Irritable; cross:.
    The teacher is out of sorts this morning.
idiom
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sort of
  • Somewhat; rather:.
idiom
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after a sort
  • In some way but not very well.
idiom
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of sorts
  • Of various kinds.
  • Of a poor or inferior kind.
idiom
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out of sorts
  • Lacking certain sorts of type.
idiom
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sort of
  • Somewhat.
idiom
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sort out
  • To analyze or resolve (difficulties, a problem, etc.).
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of sort

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin sors sort- lot ser-2 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old French sortir (“allot, sort"), from Latin sortire (“draw lots, divide, choose"), from sors
    From Wiktionary
  • From Old French sorte (“class, kind"), from Latin root of sors (“lot, fate, share, rank, category")
    From Wiktionary