Wag meaning

wăg
A humorous or droll person; a wit.
noun
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To move (the tongue) in talking, esp. in idle or malicious gossip.
verb
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A comical or humorous person; joker; wit.
noun
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Wag is defined as to move a body part quickly back and forth or up and down over and over again.

An example of wag is what a dog's tail does when the dog is happy or excited.

An example of wag is to move your tongue rapidly when talking.

verb
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To swing from side to side, especially of an animal's tail.
verb
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(UK, Australia, slang) To play truant from school.
verb
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An oscillating movement.

The wag of my dog's tail expresses happiness.

noun
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A witty person.
noun
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(business or military slang, US) A wild-assed guess; a rough estimate.
acronym
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One of the "˜wives and girlfriends' of sports stars or other celebrities, originally and especially of association football players.
acronym
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To move briskly and repeatedly from side to side, to and fro, or up and down.

The dog's tail wagged.

verb
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To move rapidly in talking. Used of the tongue.
verb
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1
(archaic) To be on one's way; depart.
verb
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1
To move (a body part) rapidly from side to side or up and down, as in playfulness, agreement, or admonition.

Wagged his finger at the giggling students.

verb
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The act or motion of wagging.

A farewell wag of the hand.

noun
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To move rapidly and repeatedly back and forth, from side to side, or up and down: said as of a part of the body.
verb
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To keep moving in talk, esp. in idle or malicious gossip.
verb
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1
To walk or move with a swaying motion; waddle.
verb
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The act or an instance of wagging.
noun
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1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
wag
Plural:
wags

Origin of wag

  • Middle English waggen wegh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps from wag

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The verb may be regarded as an iterative or emphatic form of waian waw, verb, which is often nearly synonymous; it was used, e.g., of a loose tooth. Parallel formations from the same root are the Old Norse vagga feminine, cradle (Swedish vagga, Dutch vugge), Swedish vagga (“to rock a cradle"), early modern German waggen (dialectal German wacken) to waver, totter. Compare waggle, verb

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English waggen, noun wagge, feminine root of Old English waian, (Middle English noun wae) to oscillate, shake. Compare the Old English verb waÄ¡ian

    From Wiktionary