Loot meaning

lo͝ot
The definition of loot is stolen money or goods.

An example of loot is a television and jewelry robbed from a house.

noun
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Loot is defined as to take or steal by force.

An example of loot is breaking into a liquor store during a riot and taking a bunch of alcohol.

verb
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Stolen goods or money.
noun
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(informal) Things of value, such as gifts, received.
noun
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Valuables pillaged in time of war; spoils.
noun
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To take goods from (a place) by force or without right, especially in time of war or lawlessness; plunder.

The rebels looted the city. Rioters looted the downtown stores.

verb
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To take by force or without right; steal.

Broke into the tomb and looted the grave goods.

verb
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To take goods by force or through lawless behavior.
verb
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Goods stolen or taken by force, as from a captured enemy city in wartime or by rioters or a corrupt official; plunder, spoils, etc.
noun
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The act of looting.
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To plunder; strip of valuables; despoil.
verb
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To take or carry off as plunder.
verb
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To burglarize or steal, as during a riot or natural diaster.
verb
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To engage in plundering or burglary, as during a riot or natural disaster.
verb
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(UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A kind of scoop or ladle, chiefly used to remove the scum from brine-pans in saltworks.
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The act of plundering.

The loot of an ancient city.

noun
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Plunder, booty, especially from a ransacked city.
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(colloquial, US) Any prize or profit received for free, especially Christmas presents.
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(video games) Items dropped from defeated enemies in video games and online games.
noun
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To steal, especially as part of war, riot or other group violence.
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(video games) To examine the corpse of a fallen enemy for loot.
verb
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(slang) Money.
noun
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Origin of loot

  • Hindi lūṭ from Sanskrit loptram, lotram plunder reup- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle Dutch loet, loete ("scoop, shovel, scraper"; > Modern Dutch loet), from Old Dutch *lōta, from Old Frankish *lōtija (“scoop, ladle"), from Proto-Germanic *hlōþþijō (“ladle"), from Proto-Indo-European *klehâ‚‚- (“to lay down, deposit, overlay"), from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (“to push, propel, drive"). Cognate with Scots lute, luyt (“scoop, ladle"), West Frisian loete, lete, Middle Low German lōte (“rake"), French louche ("ladle"; < Germanic). Related to lade, ladle.

    From Wiktionary

  • Attested 1788, a loan from Hindustani लूट/لوٹ (lÅ«á¹­, “spoil, booty"), from Sanskrit लुण्ट (luṇṭ, “to rob, plunder"). The verb is from 1842. Fallows (1885) records both the noun and the verb as "Recent. Anglo-Indian".

    From Wiktionary

  • In origin only applicable to plundering in warfare. A figurative meaning developed in American English in the 1920s, resulting in a generalized meaning by the 1950s

    From Wiktionary