Lute meaning

lo͝ot
A stringed instrument having a body shaped like a pear sliced lengthwise and a neck with a fretted fingerboard that is usually bent just below the tuning pegs.
noun
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A substance, such as dried clay or cement, used to pack and seal pipe joints and other connections or coat a porous surface in order to make it tight.
noun
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To coat, pack, or seal with lute.
verb
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An old stringed instrument related to the guitar, with a body shaped like half a pear and six to thirteen strings stretched along the fretted neck, which is often bent to form a sharp angle.
noun
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To play (on) a lute.
verb
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A clayey cement used to keep the joints of pipes from leaking and as a sealing agent generally.
noun
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To seal with lute.
verb
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A fretted stringed instrument, similar to a guitar, having a bowl-shaped body or soundbox.
noun
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To play on a lute, or as if on a lute.

verb
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Thick sticky clay or cement used to close up a hole or gap, especially to make something air-tight.
noun
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A packing ring, as of rubber, for fruit jars, etc.
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(brickmaking) A straight-edged piece of wood for striking off superfluous clay from mould.
noun
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To fix or fasten something with lute.
verb
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
lute
Plural:
lutes

Origin of lute

  • Middle English from Old French lut from Old Provençal laut from Arabic al-‘ūd al- the ‘ūd wood, branch, stem, lute

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French lut from Latin lutum potter's clay

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French lut (modern luth), from Old French leüt, probably from Old Provençal laüt, from Arabic العود (al-"˜Å«d, “wood") (probably representing an Andalusian Arabic or North African pronunciation).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old French lut, ultimately from Latin lutum (“mud").

    From Wiktionary