Rote meaning

rōt
Rote is defined as a routine, mechanical way of doing something.

When you repeat spelling words over and over, this is an example of memorizing something by rote.

noun
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A memorizing process using routine or repetition, often without full attention or comprehension.

Learn by rote.

noun
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The process of learning or committing something to memory through mechanical repetition, usually by hearing and repeating aloud, often without full attention to comprehension or thought for the meaning.

They didn't have copies of the music for everyone, so most of us had to learn the song by rote.

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A kind of guitar, the notes of which were produced by a small wheel or wheel-like arrangement; an instrument similar to the hurdy-gurdy.
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Of or having to do with learning through memorization.
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A medieval stringed instrument, variously supposed to have been a kind of lyre, lute, or harp.
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Mechanical routine; a fixed, habitual, repetitive, or mechanical course of procedure.

The pastoral scenes from those commercials don't bear too much resemblance to the rote of daily life on a farm.

noun
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By repetition or practice.
adjective
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To learn or repeat by rote.

verb
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Mechanical routine.
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The sound of surf breaking on the shore.
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A medieval stringed instrument variably identified with a lyre, lute, or harp.
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A fixed, mechanical way of doing something; routine.
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The sound of the surf beating on the shore.
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(rare) The roar of the surf; the sound of waves breaking on the shore.
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by rote
  • by means of memorization; specif., by means of the mechanical repetition of facts as a method of memorizing them
    To learn the multiplication table by rote.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

by rote

Origin of rote

  • Probably of Scandinavian origin Old Norse rauta to roar

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French probably of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, origin uncertain. Likely from the phrase bi (“by") rote (“heart"), c. 1300. Some have proposed a relationship either with Old French rote/rute (“route"), or Latin rota (“wheel") (see rotary), but the OED calls both suggestions groundless.

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English rote, probably of German origin; compare Middle High German rotte, and English crowd (“a kind of violin").

    From Wiktionary

  • c. 1600, from Old Norse rót (“tossing, pitching (of sea)") n, perhaps related to rauta (“to roar").

    From Wiktionary