Catechism meaning

kătĭ-kĭzəm
A body of fundamental principles or beliefs, especially when accepted uncritically.
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A body of fundamental principles or beliefs, especially when accepted uncritically.
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A manual giving basic instruction in a subject, usually by rote or repetition.
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The definition of a catechism is a question and answer style manual giving the basics of a religion or instructions in other subjects.

An example of a catechism is a book studied in a class to be confirmed in the Catholic religion.

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A close questioning or examination, as of a political figure.
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A manual giving basic instruction in a subject, usually by rote or repetition.
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A close questioning or examination, as of a political figure.
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A handbook of questions and answers for teaching the principles of a religion.
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Any similar handbook for teaching the fundamentals of a subject.
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A formal series of questions; close questioning.
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(obs.) Catechesis.
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A book, in question and answer form, summarizing the basic principles of Christianity.
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A basic manual in some subject.
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A set of questions designed to determine knowledge.
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Origin of catechism

  • French catechisme from Old French from Late Latin catēchismus from Late Greek katēkhismos from katēkhizein to teach by word of mouth catechize

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French catechisme from Old French from Late Latin catēchismus from Late Greek katēkhismos from katēkhizein to teach by word of mouth catechize

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Late Latin catechismus, from Ancient Greek *κατηχισμός (katēkhismos, “katēkhismos”), from κατηχίζω (katēkhizō, “to catechize”), a later extended form of κατηχέω (katēkheō, “to catechize, instruct, teach by word of mouth”), from κατά (kata, “down”) + ἠχέω (ēkheō, “to sound, to resound”).

    From Wiktionary