Food meaning

fo͝od
Frequency:
Material, usually of plant or animal origin, that contains or consists of essential body nutrients, such as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, or minerals, and is ingested and assimilated by an organism to produce energy, stimulate growth, and maintain life.
noun
11
11
Nourishment eaten in solid form.

Food and drink.

noun
6
7
The definition of food is nourishment taken into the body.

An example of food is chicken parmigiana.

noun
5
6
Something that nourishes or sustains in a way suggestive of physical nourishment.

Food for thought.

noun
3
2
A specified kind of food.
noun
3
2
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Used as food.
adjective
3
3
A specified kind of nourishment.

Breakfast food; plant food.

noun
3
4
Solid substances of this sort.
noun
2
0
Nourishment eaten in solid form.

Food and drink.

noun
2
0
Any substance taken into and assimilated by a plant or animal to keep it alive and enable it to grow and repair tissue; nourishment; nutriment.
noun
2
1
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A specified kind of nourishment.

Breakfast food; plant food.

noun
2
1
(countable) A foodstuff.

This shop stocks many hundreds of different foods.

noun
2
1
(uncountable) Any substance that is or can be consumed by living organisms, especially by eating, in order to sustain life.

The innkeeper brought them food and drink.

noun
1
0
(uncountable, figuratively) Anything intended to supply energy or nourishment of an entity or idea.

The man's inspiring speech gave us food for thought.

noun
1
0
Anything that nourishes or stimulates; whatever helps something to keep active, grow, etc.

Food for thought.

noun
1
1
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Of or relating to food.
adjective
1
1
Material, especially carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, that an organism uses for energy, growth, and maintaining the processes of life. Plants, algae, and some bacteria make their own food through photosynthesis, while animals and most other organisms obtain food by consuming other organisms or organic matter.
noun
1
1

Origin of food

  • Middle English fode from Old English fōda pā- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fode, fude, from Old English fōda (“food”), from Proto-Germanic *fōdô (“food”), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (“to guard, graze, feed”). Cognate with Scots fuid (“food”), Low German föde, vöde (“food”), Danish føde (“food”), Swedish föda (“food”), Icelandic fæða, fæði (“food”), Gothic (fōdeins, “food”), Latin pānis (“bread, food”), Latin pāscō (“feed, nourish”, verb). Related to fodder, foster.

    From Wiktionary