Trespass meaning

trĕs'pəs, -păs'
The transgression of a moral or social law, code, or duty.
noun
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To go beyond the limits of what is considered right or moral; do wrong; transgress.
verb
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Trespass is defined as to go onto someone's property, or to cross a social boundary.

An example of to trespass is to walk onto private land to hunt.

An example of to trespass is to give a hug to someone who doesn’t like to be touched by others.

verb
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The definition of a trespass is an action that is intrusive or offensive.

An example of a trespass is breaking into someone’s home.

noun
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To commit an unlawful injury to the person, property, or rights of another, with actual or implied force or violence, especially to enter onto another's land wrongfully.
verb
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To infringe on the privacy, time, or attention of another.
verb
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To commit an offense or a sin; transgress or err.
verb
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To go on another's land or property without permission or right.
verb
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To intrude or encroach.

To trespass on someone's time.

verb
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To commit a trespass.
verb
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The act or an instance of trespassing.
  • A moral offense; transgression.
  • An encroachment or intrusion.
  • An illegal act done forcefully against another's person, rights, or property; also, legal action for damages resulting from this.
noun
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An illegal act committed against another’s person or property; especially entering upon another’s land without the owner’s permission. In common law, a legal suit for injuries resulting from an instance of the first definition. To enter upon property without permission, either actual or constructive.
verb
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A common-law precursor to today’s negligence, nuisance, and business torts, it was a suit to remedy injury to person or property not resulting directly from the defendant’s conduct but a later consequence of same.
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Quare clausem fregit. See quare clausem fregit.
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Latin. With force and arms. An immediate injury, such as an assault to another’s person or property, accompanied by force or violence.
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Sin [1290]

Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us "” The Lord's Prayer. Matthew ch6. v.14, 15

noun
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(law) Any of various torts involving interference to another's enjoyment of his property, especially the act of being present on another's land without lawful excuse.
noun
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(intransitive, now rare) To commit an offence; to sin.
verb
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(intransitive) To go too far; to put someone to inconvenience by demand or importunity; to intrude.

To trespass upon the time or patience of another.

verb
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(law) To enter someone else's property illegally.
verb
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An intrusion or infringement on another.
noun
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Origin of trespass

  • Middle English trespassen from Old French trespasser tres- over (from Latin trāns- trans–) passer to pass pass
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Verb: From Old French trespasser (“to go across or over, transgress"), from tres- (“across, over") + passer (“to pass").
    From Wiktionary
  • Noun: From Old French trespas (“passage; offense against the law"), from trespasser.
    From Wiktionary