Intrusion meaning

ĭn-tro͝ozhən
Frequency:
The definition of an intrusion is an unwelcome interruption or a situation where somewhere private has an unwelcome visit or addition.

When you are having a quiet nap in your backyard and your neighbor's dog comes in uninvited and jumps all over you to wake you up, this is an example of an intrusion.

noun
3
1
The act of intruding or the condition of being intruded on.
noun
2
1
An inappropriate or unwelcome addition.
noun
1
1
To compromise a computer system by breaking the security of such a system or causing it to enter into an insecure state. The act of intruding—or gaining unauthorized access to a system—typically leaves traces that can be discovered by intrusion detection systems. One of the goals of intruders is to remain undetected for as long as possible so that they can continue with their malicious activity ­undisturbed. Security professionals need to take steps when a system breach is suspected. First, suspicious accounts should be disabled immediately. Then, the suspicious accounts need to be reviewed to assess who set up the account and for what reasons. Because audit logs will indicate who created the account, finding the time and date on which the account was created will be very useful information. If the account is the outcome of a crack attack, the system reviewer will have a particular time frame in which to determine whether other audit log events are “of interest.” If the reviewer wants to determine whether a suspicious application is indeed being used by a cracker to listen for incoming connections—a potential “back door” into the system—the reviewer is well advised to consider using a tool such as TCPView. The TCPView tool will tell the system reviewer what applications are using open system ports. Because crackers can put Trojan horses in place of the netstat and Isof programs, the reviewer should scan the attacked system from a different computer. This feat can be accomplished by using a service such as the free insecure.org nmap port scanner. Malware can also be triggered from the operating system’s job scheduler. A system reviewer can see what jobs—legitimate or otherwise—are scheduled to be executed in the system by typing AT at the command prompt. Haberstetzer, V. Thwarting Hacker Techniques: Signs of a Compromised System. [Online, March 21, 2005.] TechTarget Website. http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/tip/ 0,289483,sid14_gci1069097,00.html?track=NL-35.
1
3
The movement of magma through cracks in underground rocks within the Earth, usually in an upward direction. &diamf3; Rocks that form from the underground cooling of magma are generally coarse-grained (because they cool slowly so that large crystals have time to grow) and are called intrusive rocks.
0
2
Advertisement
Unauthorized access to a computer system or network. See intruder and IDS.
0
2
The forcible inclusion or entry of an external group or individual; the act of intruding.
noun
0
3
(geology) Magma forced into other rock formations; the rock formed when such magma solidifies.
noun
0
3

Origin of intrusion

  • From Old French intrusion, from Medieval Latin intrusio

    From Wiktionary