Flood meaning

flŭd
Flood is defined as to overflow, or put too much liquid into something.

An example of flood is covering the lawn with water after leaving the sprinklers on all night.

verb
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The definition of a flood is an overflowing of water onto normally dry land.

An example of flood is a river that overflows into the nearby streets.

An example of flood is a bath tub overflowing onto the floor.

noun
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The flowing in of water from the sea as the tide rises.
noun
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A great flow or outpouring.

A flood of words.

noun
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An overflowing of water on an area normally dry; inundation; deluge.
noun
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To cover or fill with or as with a flood; overflow; inundate.

Rain flooded the valley; music flooded the room.

verb
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In the Bible, the covering of the earth with water that occurred during the time of Noah.
noun
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A temporary rise of the water level, as in a river or lake or along a seacoast, resulting in its spilling over and out of its natural or artificial confines onto land that is normally dry. Floods are usually caused by excessive runoff from precipitation or snowmelt, or by coastal storm surges or other tidal phenomena. &diamf3; Floods are sometimes described according to their statistical occurrence. A fifty-year flood is a flood having a magnitude that is reached in a particular location on average once every fifty years. In any given year there is a two percent statistical chance of the occurrence of a fifty-year flood and a one percent chance of a hundred-year flood .
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To put too much fuel into the carburetor of (an engine), resulting in unsuccessful ignition.
verb
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To become inundated or submerged.

The underpass floods after a heavy rain.

verb
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To pour forth; overflow.

The river floods nearly every spring.

verb
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noun
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To put much or too much water, fuel, etc. on or in.

To flood a carburetor.

verb
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To rise, flow, or gush out in or as in a flood.
verb
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To become flooded.
verb
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A (usually disastrous) overflow of water from a lake or other body of water due to excessive rainfall or other input of water.
noun
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(figuratively) A large number or quantity of anything appearing more rapidly than can easily be dealt with.

A flood of complaints.

noun
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The flowing in of the tide, opposed to the ebb.
noun
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noun
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Menstrual discharge; menses.

noun
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verb
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To cover or partly fill as if by a flood.

The floor was flooded with beer.

They flooded the room with sewage.

verb
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(figuratively) To provide (someone or something) with a larger number or quantity of something than cannot easily be dealt with.

The station's switchboard was flooded with listeners making complaints.

verb
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(Internet, computing) To paste numerous lines of text to a chat system in order to disrupt the conversation.
verb
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(biblical) The flood referred to in the Book of Genesis in the Old Testament.
pronoun
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An overflowing of water onto land that is normally dry.
noun
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A flood tide.
noun
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A large amount or number, especially when moving from one place to another.

Received a flood of applications.

noun
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A floodlight, specifically a unit that produces a beam of intense light.
noun
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To cover or submerge with water; inundate.

The town was flooded when the dam burst.

verb
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To move into or fill in large numbers or amounts.

People flooded the square. His inbox was flooded with mail.

verb
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To overwhelm in large numbers.

The theater was flooded with ticket requests.

verb
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the Flood
  • The great flood in Noah's time: Gen. 7.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the Flood

Origin of flood

  • Middle English flod from Old English flōd pleu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English flod, from Old English flōd, from Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *plōtus, derived from *pleu- "to flow". Near cognates include Dutch vloed, German Flut, Danish flod, Icelandic flóð, and Gothic (flōdus).

    From Wiktionary