Drown meaning

droun
To kill by suffocation in water or other liquid.
verb
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To die by suffocating in water or another liquid.
verb
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To die by suffocation in water or other liquid.
verb
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To kill by submerging and suffocating in water or another liquid.
verb
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To drench thoroughly or cover with or as if with a liquid.
verb
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To deaden one's awareness of; blot out.

People who drowned their troubles in drink.

verb
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To muffle or mask (a sound) by a louder sound.

Screams that were drowned out by the passing train.

verb
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To be so loud as to overwhelm (another sound)
verb
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To cause to disappear; get rid of.

To drown one's worries in drink.

verb
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(intransitive) To be suffocated in water or other fluid; to perish by such suffocation.
verb
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To deprive of life by immersion in water or other liquid.
verb
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To overwhelm in water; to submerge; to inundate.
verb
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To overpower; to overcome; to extinguish; — said especially of sound; usually in the form "to drown out"
verb
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To lose, make hard to find or unnoticeable in an abundant mass.

The CIA gathers so much information that the actual answers it should seek are often drowned in the incessant flood of reports, recordings, satellite images etc.

verb
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To drown is to completely cover, or to die by inhaling water or another liquid.

An example of drown is to pour too much dressing on a salad.

An example of drown is to be unable to hear a conversation as an airplane passes overhead, it “drowns out” your words.

An example of drown is to have a cramp while swimming and to die because you are not able to get back to the surface for air.

verb
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The definition of drown is to forget everything by emerging yourself in another task or by drinking alcohol.

An example of to drown is to go to a bar and drink to forget that you lost your job; “to drown your sorrows.”

verb
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To drench thoroughly or cover with a liquid.
verb
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drown (one's) sorrow
  • To try to forget one's troubles by drinking alcohol.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

drown (one's) sorrow

Origin of drown

  • Middle English drounen probably of Scandinavian origin dhreg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The OED suggests an unattested Old English form *drūnian . Harper 2001 points to Old English druncnian, "probably influenced" by Old Norse drukkna (cf. Danish drukne) . Funk & Wagnall's has Middle English drounen, drūnen, 'of uncertain origin'. It has been theorised (see e.g. ODS) that it may represent a direct loan of Old Norse drukkna, but this is described by the OED as being "on phonetic and other grounds [...] highly improbable" .

    From Wiktionary