Swamp meaning

swŏmp, swômp
The definition of a swamp is a low area of land that is always or sometimes saturated with water.

An example of a swamp is the Okefenokee swamp located in Georgia and Florida.

noun
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(nautical) To fill (a ship or boat) with water to the point of sinking it.
verb
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Swamp is defined as to be sunk or overwhelmed.

An example of to swamp is a supervisor giving their employee a ton of work to do.

verb
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A situation or place fraught with difficulties and imponderables.

A financial swamp.

noun
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To inundate or burden; overwhelm.

She was swamped with work.

verb
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To become full of water or sink.
verb
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A piece of wet, spongy land that is permanently or periodically covered with water, characterized by growths of shrubs and trees; marsh; bog.
noun
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Of or native to a swamp.
adjective
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To plunge or sink in a swamp, deep water, etc.
verb
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To drench in or cover with or as if with water.
verb
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To flood or submerge with or as with water.
verb
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To overcome or overwhelm; ruin.

Swamped by debts.

verb
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To sink (a boat) by filling with water.
verb
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To make (a path) or clear (an area) by removing underbrush and slash, as in logging.
verb
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To become swamped; sink in or as in a swamp.
verb
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An area of low-lying wet or seasonally flooded land, often having trees and dense shrubs or thickets.
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A piece of wet, spongy land; low ground saturated with water; soft, wet ground which may have a growth of certain kinds of trees, but is unfit for agricultural or pastoral purposes.
noun
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A type of wetland that stretches for vast distances, and is home to many creatures who have adapted specifically to that environment.
noun
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To drench or fill with water.

The boat was swamped in the storm.

verb
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To overwhelm; to make too busy, or overrun the capacity of.

I have been swamped with paperwork ever since they started using the new system.

verb
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(figuratively) To plunge into difficulties and perils; to overwhelm; to ruin; to wreck.
verb
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Origin of swamp

  • Perhaps of Low German origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From a fusion of Middle English swam (“swamp, muddy pool, bog, marsh", also "fungus, mushroom"), from Old English swamm (“mushroom, fungus, sponge") and Middle English sompe (“marsh, morass"), from Middle Dutch somp, sump (“marsh, swamp") or Middle Low German sump (“marsh, swamp"), from Old Saxon *sump (“swamp, marsh"); all from Proto-Germanic *sumpaz. Cognate with Dutch zwamp (“swamp, marsh, fen"), Middle Low German swamp (“sponge, mushroom"), Dutch zomp (“swamp, lake, marshy place"), German Sumpf (“swamp"), Swedish sump (“swamp"). Related also to Dutch zwam (“fungus, punk, tinder"), German Schwamm (“mushroom, fungus, sponge"), Swedish svamp (“mushroom, fungus, sponge"), Icelandic svampur, svepper (“fungus"), Gothic [script?] (swumsl, “a ditch"). Related to sump, swim.

    From Wiktionary