Slough meaning

slo͝o
The definition of a slough is the skin of a snake or a layer or covering that has been discarded.

An example of slough is the skin of an onion that's been removed and thrown away.

noun
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An outer layer or covering that is shed or removed.
noun
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To be cast off or shed; come off.
verb
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To shed a slough.

Every time that a snake sloughs.

verb
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A layer or mass of dead tissue separated from surrounding living tissue, as in a wound, sore, or inflammation.
noun
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To separate from surrounding living tissue. Used of dead tissue.
verb
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To cast off or shed (skin or a covering).

Came inside and sloughed off his coat.

verb
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To discard or disregard as undesirable or unfavorable.

Sloughed off her misgivings.

verb
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A borough of southeast England, a residential and industrial suburb of London.
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The skin of a snake, esp. the outer layer that is periodically cast off.
noun
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Any castoff layer, covering, etc.
noun
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A mass of dead tissue in, or separating from, living tissue or an ulceration.
noun
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To separate from the surrounding tissue.
verb
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A place, as a hollow, full of soft, deep mud.
noun
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A depression or hollow, usually filled with deep mud or mire.
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A stagnant swamp, marsh, bog, or pond, especially as part of a bayou, inlet, or backwater.
noun
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A state of deep despair or moral degradation.
noun
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The dead outer skin shed by a reptile or amphibian.
noun
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Slough is defined as to shed or throw away.

An example of slough is to exfoliate the skin on your body.

verb
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To shed skin or other covering.
verb
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To shed or throw off (slough); get rid of.
verb
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To get rid of (a card); discard.
verb
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Deep, hopeless dejection or discouragement.
noun
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Moral degradation.
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A swamp, bog, or marsh, esp. one that is part of an inlet or backwater.
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A layer or mass of dead tissue separated from surrounding living tissue, as in a wound, sore, or inflammation.
noun
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An outer layer or covering that is shed or removed.
noun
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To separate from surrounding living tissue. Used of dead tissue.
verb
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The dead outer skin shed by a reptile or an amphibian.
noun
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To shed an outer layer of skin.
verb
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The skin shed by a snake or other reptile.

That is the slough of a rattler; we must be careful.

noun
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Dead skin on a sore or ulcer.

This is the slough that came off of his skin after the burn.

noun
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To shed (skin).

This skin is being sloughed.

verb
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(intransitive) To slide off (like a layer of skin).

A week after he was burned, a layer of skin on his arm sloughed off.

verb
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(card games) To discard.

East sloughed a heart.

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(UK) A muddy or marshy area.
noun
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(Eastern United States) A type of swamp or shallow lake system, typically formed as or by the backwater of a larger waterway, similar to a bayou with trees.

We paddled under a canopy of trees through the slough.

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(Western United States) A secondary channel of a river delta, usually flushed by the tide.

The Sacramento River Delta contains dozens of sloughs that are often used for water-skiing and fishing.

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A state of depression.

John is in a slough.

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(Canadian Prairies) A small pond, often alkaine, many but not all are formed by glacial potholes.

Potholes or sloughs formed by a glacier's retreat from the central plains of North America, are now known to be some of the world's most productive ecosystems.

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A town in east Berkshire, and formerly in Buckinghamshire, close to Heathrow Airport.
pronoun
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slough over
  • To gloss over; minimize.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

slough over

Origin of slough

  • Middle English slughe akin to Middle High German slūch, sluoch sloughed off snake skin (Modern German Schlauch hose, tire tube)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English slōh

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, akin to Middle High German slûch (“slough") (whence German Schlauch (“tube, hose")).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English slōh, probably from Proto-Germanic *slōhaz.

    From Wiktionary