Drench meaning

drĕnch
The act of wetting or becoming wet through and through.
noun
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Something that drenches.

A drench of rain.

noun
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A large dose of liquid medicine, especially one administered to an animal by pouring down the throat.
noun
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To make (a horse, cow, etc.) swallow a medicinal liquid.
verb
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To make wet all over; soak or saturate in liquid.
verb
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A large liquid dose, esp. for a sick animal.
noun
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A drenching or soaking.
noun
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A solution for soaking.
noun
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To wet through and through; soak.
verb
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To administer a large oral dose of liquid medicine to an animal.
verb
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The act of wetting or becoming wet through and through.
noun
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A large dose of liquid medicine, especially one administered to an animal by pouring down the throat.
noun
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A draught administered to an animal.
noun
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Shakespeare.

Give my roan horse a drench.

noun
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To soak, to make very wet.
verb
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To cause to drink; especially, to dose (e.g. a horse) with medicine by force.
verb
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(obsolete, UK) A military vassal, mentioned in the Domesday Book.

noun
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Drench is defined as to soak, or to make an animal swallow a liquid medicine.

An example of to drench is to pour water all over a paper plate.

An example of to drench is to force a cow to take medicine.

verb
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The definition of a drench is a large amount of a liquid medicine, or an instance or act of soaking.

An example of a drench is a liquid medicine for a horse.

An example of a drench is a pouring of lemonade all over a shoe.

noun
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To wet through and through; soak.
verb
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To administer a large oral dose of liquid medicine to (an animal).
verb
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To provide with something in great abundance; surfeit.

Just drenched in money.

verb
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Origin of drench

  • Middle English drenchen to drown from Old English drencan to give to drink, drown dhreg- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English drenchen, from Old English drenċan, from Proto-Germanic *drankijaną (compare Dutch drenken ‘to get a drink’, German tränken ‘to water, give a drink’), causative of *drinkaną (“to drink”). More at drink.
    From Wiktionary
  • Anglo-Saxon dreng warrior, soldier, akin to Icelandic drengr.
    From Wiktionary