Hose definition

hōz
(slang) To beat as with a hose.
verb
4
0
To water, drench, or wash with a hose.

Hosed down the deck; hosed off the dog.

verb
2
0
A flexible tube for conveying liquids or gases under pressure.
noun
1
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(historical) A tightfitting outer garment worn by men, covering the hips, legs, and feet, or extending only to the knees or ankles, and attached to the doublet by cords or ribbons (called points)
noun
1
0
Breeches reaching down to the knees. Used only in the plural.
noun
0
0
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To attack and kill (someone), typically by use of a firearm.
verb
0
0
To exploit, cheat, or defraud.
verb
0
0
Stockings or pantyhose.
noun
0
0
Socks.
noun
0
0
A flexible tube used to convey fluids, esp. water from a hydrant or faucet.
noun
0
0
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Such a tube equipped with a nozzle and attachments.
noun
0
0
To put water on with a hose; sprinkle or drench with a hose.
verb
0
0
(slang) To cheat; deceive; trick.
verb
0
0
(countable) A flexible tube conveying water or other fluid.
noun
0
0
(uncountable) A stocking-like garment worn on the legs; pantyhose, women's tights.
noun
0
0
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To water or spray with a hose.
verb
0
0
To provide with hose (garment)
verb
0
0
To attack and kill somebody, usually using a firearm.
verb
0
0
To trick or deceive.
verb
0
0
(computing) To break a computer so everything needs to be reinstalled; to wipe all files.
verb
0
0
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Stockings; socks. Used only in the plural.
noun
0
1
Close-fitting breeches or leggings reaching up to the hips and fastened to a doublet, formerly worn by men. Used only in the plural.
noun
0
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
hose
Plural:
hoses

Origin of hose

  • Middle English a stocking from Old English hosa leg covering (s)keu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English hose (“leggings, hose”), from Old English hose, hosa (“hose, leggings”), from Proto-Germanic *husǭ (“coverings, leggings, trousers”) (compare West Frisian hoas 'hose', Dutch hoos 'stocking, water-hose', German Hose 'trousers'), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)keu-s (compare Tocharian A kać 'skin', Russian кишка (kiška) 'gut', Ancient Greek κύστις (kústis) 'bladder', Sanskrit कोष्ठ (koṣṭha, “intestine”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)keu- (“to cover”). More at sky.

    From Wiktionary