Monk definition

mŭngk
Frequency:
A member of a male religious order living in a monastery or hermitage observing a common rule, under vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.
noun
9
0
A man who is a member of a brotherhood living in a monastery and devoted to a discipline prescribed by his order.

A Carthusian monk; a Buddhist monk.

noun
8
1
(person) 1st Duke of Albemarle 1608-70; Eng. general & politician.
proper name
2
1
(person) 1920-82; U.S. jazz pianist & composer.
proper name
2
1
The definition of a monk is man in a religious order who lives a life of poverty, chastity and obedience.

An example of a monk is a Buddhist man living with other Buddhists and following strict life rules.

noun
1
0
Advertisement
A male member of a monastic order who has devoted his life for religious service.
noun
0
0
In earlier usage, an eremite or hermit devoted to solitude, as opposed to a cenobite, who lived communally.
noun
0
0
(slang) A male who leads an isolated life; a loner, a hermit.
noun
0
0
(slang) An unmarried man who does not have sexual relationships.
noun
0
0
(slang) A judge.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(printing) A blotch or spot of ink on a printed page, caused by the ink not being properly distributed; distinguished from a friar, or white spot caused by a deficiency of ink.
noun
0
0
A piece of tinder made of agaric, used in firing the powder hose or train of a mine.
noun
0
0
A South American monkey (Pithecia monachus); also applied to other species, as Cebus xanthocephalus.
noun
0
0
The European bullfinch.
noun
0
0
Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
noun
0
0
Advertisement

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
monk
Plural:
monks

Origin of monk

  • Middle English munk from Old English munuc from Late Latin monachus from Late Greek monakhos from Greek single from monos men-4 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old English munuc, from Latin monachus, from Ancient Greek μοναχός (monachos, “single, solitary"), from μόνος (monos, “alone")

    From Wiktionary