Tube definition

to͝ob, tyo͝ob
(music) The cylindrical part of a wind instrument.
noun
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Tube means a hollow cylinder.

An example of a tube is manicotti pasta.

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The definition of a tube is a pliable container with a screw cap at one end to keep it closed.

An example of tube is the container that toothpaste comes in.

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A small flexible cylindrical container sealed at one end and having a screw cap at the other, for pigments, toothpaste, or other pastelike substances.
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(botany) The lower, cylindrical part of a gamopetalous corolla or a gamosepalous calyx.
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The elongated space inside a wave when it is breaking.
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(informal) The fallopian tubes.
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A hollow cylinder, especially one that conveys a fluid or functions as a passage.
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An organic structure having the shape or function of a tube; a duct.

A bronchial tube.

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An electron tube.
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A vacuum tube.
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A tunnel.
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An underground railroad system, especially the one in London, England.
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An inner tube.
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An inflatable tube or cushion made of rubber or plastic and used for recreational riding, as behind a motor boat or down a snow-covered slope.
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Television.

What's on the tube?

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A television set.
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To provide with a tube; insert a tube in.
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To place in or enclose in a tube.
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To ride or float on an inflated tube for recreation.
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A rubber casing inflated with air and used, esp. formerly, with an outer casing to form an automotive tire.
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A cylindrical container made of thin, pliable metal, plastic, etc., fitted at one end with a screw cap, and used for holding pastes or semiliquids, which can be squeezed out.
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(bot.) The lower, united part of a gamopetalous corolla or a gamosepalous calyx.
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(elec.) The tubular space bounded by the lines of electric or magnetic force passing through every point on a closed curve on the outside of a charged body.
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A hollow cylinder or pipe of metal, glass, rubber, etc., usually long in proportion to its diameter, used for conveying fluids, etc.
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An instrument, part, organ, etc. resembling a tube.

Bronchial tubes, eustachian tubes.

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A fallopian tube.
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A tubular tunnel for a railroad, subway, etc.
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(brit.) An underground electric railway; subway.
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To provide with, place in, or pass through a tube or tubes.
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To make tubular.
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A hollow cylinder, especially one that conveys a fluid or functions as a passage.
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An anatomical structure or organ having the shape or function of a tube; a duct.
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An approximately cylindrical container, usually with a crimped end and a screw top, used to contain and dispense semi-liquid substances.

A tube of toothpaste.

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(UK, colloquial, often capitalized as Tube) The London Underground railway system, originally referred to the lower level lines that ran in tubular tunnels as opposed to the higher ones which ran in rectangular section tunnels. (Often the tube.)

No mate, I am taking the tube!

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(Australia, slang) A tin can containing beer (other beverage?).
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(surfing) A wave which pitches forward when breaking, creating a hollow space inside.
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(North America, colloquial) A television. Also, derisively, boob tube. British: telly.

Are you just going to sit around all day and watch the tube?

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To make or use tubes.

She tubes lipstick.

They tubed down the Colorado River.

verb
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(informal) The London Underground.
pronoun
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Anything that is hollow and cylindrical in shape.
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(slang) down the tubes
  • Into a state of failure or ruin:
    Saw her plans go down the tubes.
idiom
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down the tube
  • in or into a condition of failure, defeat, etc.
idiom
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the tube
  • television
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
tube
Plural:
tubes

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

down the tube
the tube

Origin of tube

  • French from Old French from Latin tubus

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French tube, from Latin tubus (“tube, pipe").

    From Wiktionary