Dry meaning

drī
Referring to a current-carrying conductor or circuit that is not electrified or that carries current of such low voltage that it will not arc. Dry is a reference to the inability of the conductor or circuit to produce any result. See also circuit, conductor, current, dry copper pair, and voltage.
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Devoid of bias or personal concern.

Presented a dry critique.

adjective
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Of or relating to solid rather than liquid substances or commodities.

Dry weight.

adjective
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No longer wet.

The paint is dry.

adjective
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Having no adornment or coloration; plain.

The dry facts.

adjective
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Not sweet as a result of the decomposition of sugar during fermentation. Used of wines.
adjective
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Unproductive of the expected results.

A mind dry of new ideas.

adjective
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To remove the moisture from; make dry.

Laundry dried by the sun.

verb
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To preserve (meat or other foods, for example) by extracting the moisture.
verb
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To become dry.

The sheets dried quickly in the sun.

verb
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A prohibitionist.
noun
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Not watery; not under water.

Dry land.

adjective
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Having no moisture; not wet or damp.
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Not shedding tears.
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Lacking rain or water.

A dry summer.

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Having lost liquid or moisture.
  • Arid; withered.
  • Empty of water or other liquid.
  • Dehydrated.
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Needing water or drink; thirsty.
adjective
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Not yielding milk.

A dry cow.

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Without butter, jam, etc. on it.

Dry toast.

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Solid; not liquid.
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Not sweet; unsweetened; sec.

Dry wine.

adjective
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Having no mucous or watery discharge.

A dry cough.

adjective
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Prohibiting or opposed to the manufacture or sale of alcoholic beverages.

A dry town.

adjective
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Not colored by emotion, prejudice, etc.; plain; matter-of-fact.

Dry facts.

adjective
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Clever and shrewd but ironic or subtle.

Dry wit.

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Not producing results; unfruitful.

A dry interview.

adjective
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Boring, dull, or tedious.

A dry lecture.

adjective
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Harsh; grating.
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(obs.) Without bleeding.

A dry death.

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(rare) Dryness or drought.
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(rare) Dry land.
noun
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(informal) A prohibitionist.
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To make or become dry.
verb
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Could you hand me a dry towel?

My throat feels itchy and dry.

Cover the chicken as it bakes or it'll get too dry.

adjective
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(chemistry) Free of water in any state; anhydrous.

Dry alcohol is 200 proof.

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(of an alcoholic beverage) Lacking sugar or low in sugar; not sweet.

I like to take a dry sherry before lunch on Sundays.

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Maintaining temperance; void or abstinent from alcoholic beverages.

A former alcoholic, he's been dry for almost a year now.

You'll have to drive out of this dry county to find any liquor.

It was a dry house.

adjective
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(of a person or joke) Subtly humorous, yet without mirth.
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(of a scientist or his laboratory) Not working with chemical or biological matter, but, rather, doing computations.
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(masonry) Built without mortar; dry-stone.
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(of animals) Not giving milk.

The cow is dry.

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Lacking interest or amusement; barren; unembellished.

A very dry lecture on archaeology.

adjective
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(fine arts) Exhibiting a sharp, frigid preciseness of execution, or lacking delicate contours and soft transitions of colour.
adjective
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(intransitive) To lose moisture.

The clothes dried on the line.

verb
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To remove moisture from.

Devin dried her eyes with a handkerchief.

verb
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(intransitive, figuratively) To cease or cause to cease.

Their sources of income dried up.

The stream of chatter dried up.

verb
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(computing) Acronym of don't repeat yourself. (It is a software development principle aimed at reducing repetition.)
acronym
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The definition of dry is something without moisture, water or liquid.

An example of dry is chapped lips, dry lips.

An example of dry is dishes that have been sitting in a dish drainer overnight, dry dishes.

adjective
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Free from liquid or moisture.

Changed to dry clothes.

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Having a large proportion of strong liquor to other ingredients.

A dry martini.

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Eaten or served without butter, gravy, or other garnish.

Dry toast; dry meat.

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Wearisome; dull.

A dry lecture filled with trivial details.

adjective
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Humorous in an understated or unemotional way.

Dry wit.

adjective
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Prohibiting or opposed to the sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages.

A dry county.

adjective
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Constructed without mortar or cement.

Dry masonry.

adjective
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Thirsty; needing drink.
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dry out
  • to make or become thoroughly dry
  • to withdraw from addiction to alcohol or a narcotic
idiom
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dry up
  • to make or become thoroughly dry; parch or wither
  • to make or become unproductive, uncreative, etc.
  • to stop talking: used in the imperative
idiom
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not dry behind the ears
  • immature; inexperienced; naive
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

not dry behind the ears

Origin of dry

  • Middle English drie from Old English drȳge

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English drye, drie, dri, drige, dryge, drüȝe, Old English drȳġe (“dry; parched, withered”), from Proto-Germanic *drūgiz, *draugiz (“dry, hard”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰerǵʰ- (“to strengthen; become hard”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰer- (“to hold, support”). Cognate with Scots dry, drey (“dry”), North Frisian drüg, driig, drüüg, dröög, drüch (“dry”), Saterland Frisian druuch (“dry”), West Frisian droech (“dry”), Dutch droog (“dry”), Low German dreuge, dröög, drög, drege, dree (“dry”), German trocken (“dry”), Icelandic draugur (“a dry log”). Related also to West Frisian drege (“long-lasting”), Danish drøj (“tough”), Swedish dryg (“lasting, hard”), Icelandic drjúgur (“ample, long”), Latin firmus (“strong, firm, stable, durable”). See also drought, drain, dree.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English dryġan (“to dry”), from dryġe (“dry”)

    From Wiktionary