Damp meaning

dămp
Slightly wet.

A damp sponge.

adjective
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(archaic) Dejected; depressed.
adjective
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(archaic) A dejected or depressed state.
noun
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Damp is defined as to try to restrain or limit something, or to make something slightly wet.

When you dab a shirt with a wet towel to get a stain out and you make the shirt slightly wet, this is an example of when you damp.

When you try to stop yourself from feeling sad and crying, this is an example of when you damp your emotions.

When you reduce how hot or bright a fire is burning, this is an example of when you damp.

verb
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Humid.

Damp air.

adjective
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2
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The definition of damp is something that is slightly wet.

A shirt that was taken out of the dryer before it is completely dry is an example of something that would be described as damp.

adjective
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1
Foul or poisonous gas that sometimes pollutes the air in coal mines.
noun
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To make damp or moist; moisten.
verb
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To suppress or extinguish (a fire) by reducing or cutting off air.
verb
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To restrain or check; discourage.

News that damped our enthusiasm.

verb
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(music) To slow or stop the vibrations of (the strings of a keyboard instrument) with a damper.
verb
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(physics) To decrease the amplitude of (an oscillating system).
verb
1
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A slight wetness; moisture.
noun
1
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A harmful gas sometimes found in mines; firedamp; blackdamp.
noun
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Somewhat moist or wet; humid.
adjective
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Dejected; depressed.
adjective
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To make damp; moisten.
verb
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To slow the combustion of (a fire) by cutting off most of the air supply; bank.
verb
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To check or reduce (energy or action)
verb
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To check or deaden the vibration of (a piano string, drum membrane, etc.)
verb
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To reduce the amplitude of (oscillations, waves, etc.)
verb
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Being in a state between dry and wet; moderately wet; moist.

O'erspread with a damp sweat and holy fear - John Dryden.

The lawn was still damp so we decided not to sit down.

The paint is still damp, so please don't touch it.

adjective
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noun
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(archaic) Fog; fogginess; vapor.
noun
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(archaic) Dejection or depression.
noun
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(archaic or historical, mining) A gaseous product, formed in coal mines, old wells, pits, etc.
noun
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(archaic) To dampen; to render damp; to moisten; to make humid, or moderately wet; as, to damp cloth.
verb
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(archaic) To put out, as fire; to depress or deject; to deaden; to cloud; to check or restrain, as action or vigor; to make dull; to weaken; to discourage.
verb
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To suppress vibrations (mechanical) or oscillations (electrical) by converting energy to heat (some other form of energy).

To damp your tender hopes - Mark Akenside.

Usury dulls and damps all industries, improvements, and new inventions, wherein money would be stirring if it were not for this slug - Francis Bacon.

How many a day has been damped and darkened by an angry word! - Sir John Lubbock.

The failure of his enterprise damped the spirit of the soldiers. - Thomas Babington Macaulay.

Hollow rollers damp vibration. - [1]

verb
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damp off
  • to wither and die because of mildew, as seedlings, plant shoots, etc.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of damp

  • Middle English poison gas perhaps from Middle Dutch vapor

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Akin to Low German damp, Dutch damp, and Danish damp (“vapor, steam, fog”), German Dampf, Icelandic dampi, Swedish damm (“dust”), and to German dampf imperative of dimpfen (“to smoke”). Also Old English dampen (“to choke, suffocate”).

    From Wiktionary