Moist definition

moist
Frequency:
Tearful.

Moist eyes.

adjective
8
1
Slightly wet; damp.
adjective
6
1
Tearful.
adjective
5
0
Characterized by considerable rainfall; rainy.

A moist climate.

adjective
7
3
Slightly wet; damp.

A moist sponge; a dog's moist nose.

adjective
5
1
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The definition of moist is something that is damp or a little wet.

An example of moist is a cake that is spongy and not dry.

adjective
2
0
Characterized by rain or humidity.
adjective
1
0
Slightly wet; characterised by the presence of moisture, not dry; damp. [from 14th c.]
adjective
1
0
Humid.

The moist gulf air.

adjective
1
1
Of eyes: tearful, wet with tears. [from 14th c.]
adjective
0
0
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Of weather, climate etc.: rainy, damp. [from 14th c.]
adjective
0
0
(medicine) Characterised by the presence of pus, mucus etc. [from 14th c.]
adjective
0
0
(colloquial) Sexually lubricated (of the vagina); sexually aroused, turned on (of a woman). [from 20th c.]
adjective
0
0
(sciences, now historical) Pertaining to one of the four essential qualities formerly believed to be present in all things, characterised by wetness. [from 14th c.]
adjective
0
1
Juicy or succulent; not dried out.

Basting keeps the turkey moist in the oven.

adjective
4
7
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Other Word Forms

Adjective

Base Form:
moist
Comparative:
moister
Superlative:
moistest

Origin of moist

  • Middle English moiste from Old French alteration (influenced by Latin musteus juicy) of Vulgar Latin muscidus alteration of Latin mūcidus moldy from mūcus mucus

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English moiste (“moist, wet", also "fresh"), from Anglo-Norman moiste and Middle French moiste (“damp, mouldy, wet"), of obscure origin and formation. Perhaps from a late variant of Latin mÅ«cidus (“slimy, musty") combined with a reflex of Latin mustum (“must").

    From Wiktionary