Liverwort definitions

lĭv'ər-wûrt', -wôrt'
Any of numerous small, green, nonvascular plants of the division Marchantiophyta, growing in moist environments and consisting of either a leafy mosslike structure or a flat thallus that is often lobed.
noun
8
0
Any of two classes (Hepaticopsida and Anthocerotopsida) of bryophytes, often forming dense, green, mosslike mats on logs, rocks, or soil in moist places.
noun
7
0
Any of numerous small, green nonvascular plants of the division Marchantiophyta. Many liverworts reproduce asexually by means of gemmae. They also reproduce sexually, and their free-swimming sperm, produced in structures called antheridia, require liquid water, such as splashing raindrops, to reach the egg-producing archegonia. After fertilization, the small sporophyte grows directly on or in the gametophyte and is nourished by it. Liverworts are common in the tropics and often grow in moist soil, on damp rocks, and on tree trunks. Some liverworts have leafy bodies, while others have only a simple thallus. The name liverwort comes from the liverlike shape of the thalli of some species.
4
0
A type of bryophyte (includes mosses, liverworts, and hornworts) with a leafy stem or leafless thallus characterized by a dominant gametophyte stage and a lack of stomata on the sporophyte stage of the life cycle.
noun
0
0

Origin of liverwort

From liver + Old English wort (“plant"), from the belief that some species looked like livers and were useful for treating the liver medicinally.