Livery meaning

lĭv'ə-rē, lĭv'rē
Characteristic dress or appearance.
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The definition of a livery is a particular uniform or a design, or the act of maintaining horses.

An example of a livery is the uniform of the army.

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A distinctive uniform worn by the male servants of a household.
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The distinctive dress worn by the members of a particular group; uniform.

Ushers in livery.

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The costume or insignia worn by the retainers of a feudal lord.
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A business that offers vehicles, such as automobiles or boats, for hire.
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Official delivery of property, especially land, to a new owner.
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An identifying uniform such as was formerly worn by feudal retainers or is now worn by servants or those in some particular group, trade, etc.
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The people wearing such uniforms.
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A place where boats can be rented.
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The legal delivery of property, esp. landed property, into the hands of the new owner.
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Any distinctive identifying uniform worn by a group, such as the uniform worn by chauffeurs and male servants.
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The paint scheme of a vehicle or fleet of vehicles.

The airline's new livery received a mixed reaction from the press.

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(US) A taxicab or limousine.
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(law) The delivery of property from one owner to the next.
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(law) The writ by which property is obtained.
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(historical) The rental of horses or carriages; the rental of canoes; the care and/or boarding of horses for money.
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(historical) A stable that keeps horses or carriages for rental.
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An allowance of food; a ration, as given out to a family, to servants, to horses, etc.
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Release from wardship; deliverance.
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A low grade of wool.
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(archaic) To clothe in.

He liveried his servents in the most modest of clothing.

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Origin of livery

  • Middle English liveri from Old French livree delivery from feminine past participle of livrer to deliver from Latin līberāre to free from līber free leudh- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Anglo-Norman liveree, from Old French livree. Compare modern French livrer.
    From Wiktionary