Wort meaning

wûrt, wôrt
A plant. Often used in combination.

Liverwort; milkwort.

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An infusion of malt that is fermented to make beer.
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A liquid, produced from malt and hot water, which can be fermented to make beer or ale, or fermented and distilled to make whiskey.
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A plant, vegetable, or herb.
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Any of various plants or herbs. The word is usually used in combination to refer to specific plants, e.g. St. John's wort; however, it may be used on its own as a generic term.
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Liquid extract from the ground malt and grain soaked in hot water, the mash, as one of the steps in making beer.
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Origin of wort

  • Middle English from Old English wyrt wrād- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English wyrt wrād- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English wort, worte, from Old English wyrt, wyrte (“brewing wort, new beer, spice"), from Proto-Germanic *wurtijō (“spice"), from Proto-Indo-European *werǝd-, *wrād- (“sprout, root"). Cognate with Dutch wort (“wort"), German Würze (“wort, seasoning, spice"), Danish urt (“beer wort"), Swedish vört (“beer wort").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English wort, wurt, wirte, from Old English wyrt (“herb, vegetable, plant, crop, root"), from Germanic wurtiz, from Proto-Indo-European *wréhâ‚‚ds. Cognate with German Wurz (“herb, root"), Danish urt (“herb"), Swedish ört (“herb"), Icelandic jurt (“herb"), Latin rādix (“root"). More at root.

    From Wiktionary