Back meaning

băk
The definition of back is in the rear.

An example of back used as an adjective is a back yard which means a yard situated behind the house.

adjective
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The part opposite to or behind that adapted for view or use.

The back of the hand; wrote on the back of the photograph.

noun
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The part or area farthest from the front.
noun
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Back means the rear of something.

An example of a back is the tail of an animal.

noun
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To adduce evidence in support of; substantiate.

Backed the argument with facts.

verb
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The reverse side, as of a coin.
noun
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A shallow vat or tub used chiefly by brewers.
noun
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The backbone or spine.
noun
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A part that supports or strengthens from the rear.

The back of a couch.

noun
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To cause to move backward or in a reverse direction.

Back the car up and then make the turn.

verb
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To furnish or strengthen with a back or backing.
verb
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To bet or wager on.
verb
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To form the back or background of.

Snowcapped mountains back the village.

verb
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To shift to a counterclockwise direction. Used of the wind.
verb
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(place) River in N Canada, flowing northeast into the Arctic Ocean: c. 600 mi (966 km)
proper name
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Back is defined as to support or to move in a backward motion.

An example of to back is to financially support a political candidate.

An example of to back is to back up which is to drive a car backwards into the driveway.

verb
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The backbone or spine.
noun
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To provide with musical accompaniment. Often used with up.
verb
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To move backward.

Backed out of the garage.

verb
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Located or placed in the rear.

Deliveries should be made at the back entrance.

adjective
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Distant from a center of activity; remote.
adjective
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Of a past date; not current.

A back issue of a periodical.

adjective
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Being owed or due from an earlier time; in arrears.

Back pay.

adjective
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Being in a backward direction.

A back step.

adjective
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(linguistics) Pronounced with the back of the tongue, as oo in cool. Used of vowels.
adjective
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At, to, or toward the rear or back.
adverb
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In, to, or toward a former location.

Went back for the class reunion.

adverb
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In, to, or toward a former condition.

When the spell broke, the prince turned back into a frog.

adverb
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In, to, or toward a past time.

This story goes back to the 1920s.

adverb
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In reserve or concealment.

We kept back some money for emergencies.

adverb
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In check or under restraint.

Barriers held the crowd back.

adverb
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In reply or return.

E-mailed back that he would be late.

adverb
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The part of the body opposite to the front; in humans and many other animals, the part to the rear or top reaching from the nape of the neck to the end of the spine.
noun
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The part of a chair that supports one's back.
noun
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The part of a garment or harness that fits on the back of a person or animal.
noun
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Physical strength.

Put some back into the work.

noun
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The rear or hind part of anything; part behind or opposite the front.

The back of the room, the back of his leg.

noun
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The part or side of anything that is less often used, seen, etc.

The back of the hand; the back of a carpet, textile, etc.; the back of a knife.

noun
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(mining) The roof or overhead part of an underground passage.
noun
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(sports) A player positioned behind many of his or her teammates, as a running back in football or a halfback in soccer.
noun
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At the rear or back; behind.
adjective
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Distant or remote.

Back country.

adjective
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Of or for a time in the past.

A back copy of a newspaper, back pay.

adjective
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In a backward direction; returning; reversed.

A back step.

adjective
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(phonet.) Articulated with the tongue in a position toward the back of the mouth.
adjective
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At, to, or toward the rear; backward.
adverb
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To or toward a former position or location.
adverb
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Into or toward a previous condition.
adverb
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So as to keep in reserve or concealment.

To hold back information.

adverb
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To cause to move backward, or to the rear.
verb
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To be at the back of; stand behind.
verb
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To support or help, as with money, endorsement, etc.
verb
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To make a wager in support of; bet on.
verb
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To get on the back of; mount.
verb
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To provide with a back or backing.
verb
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To form the back of.
verb
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To sign on the back; endorse.
verb
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To provide security for (a currency, loan, etc.)
verb
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To have the back in a certain place or direction.

The house backs on a lake.

verb
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(meteorol.) To shift counterclockwise (in the Northern Hemisphere)
verb
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A vat or tub used in certain industrial processes.
noun
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The backbone or spine.
noun
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(not comparable) Near the rear.

Go in the back door of the house.

adjective
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(not comparable) Not current.

I’d like to find a back issue of that magazine.

adjective
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(not comparable) Far from the main area.

They took a back road.

adjective
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(comparable, phonetics) Produced in the back of the mouth.

"U" in "rude" is a back vowel.

adjective
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(not comparable) To or in a previous condition or place.

He gave back the money. He needs his money back. He was on vacation, but now he’s back. The office fell into chaos when you left, but now order is back.

adverb
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Away from the front or from an edge.

Sit all the way back in your chair.

Step back from the curb.

adverb
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In a manner that impedes.

Fear held him back.

adverb
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In a reciprocal manner.

If you hurt me, I'll hurt you back.

adverb
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The rear of the body, especially the part between the neck and the end of the spine and opposite the chest and belly.

Could you please scratch my back?

noun
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The spine and associated tissues.

I hurt my back lifting those crates.

noun
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The side of any object which is opposite the front or useful side.

Turn the book over and look at the back.

noun
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The reverse side; the side that is not normally seen.

I hung the clothes on the back of the door.

noun
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That which is farthest away from the front.

He sat in the back of the room.

noun
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Area behind, such as the backyard of a house.

We'll meet out in the back of the library.

noun
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The part of something that goes last.

The car was near the back of the train.

noun
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The side of a blade opposite the side used for cutting.

Tap it with the back of your knife.

noun
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The part of a piece of clothing which covers the back.

I still need to finish the back of your dress.

noun
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The edge of a book which is bound.

The titles are printed on the backs of the books.

noun
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The backrest, the part of a piece of furniture which receives the human back.

Can you fix the back of this chair?

noun
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(figuratively) Upper part of a natural object which is considered to resemble an animal's back.

The small boat raced over the backs of the waves.

noun
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(sports) In some team sports, a position behind most players on the team.

The backs were lined up in an I formation.

noun
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A support or resource in reserve.
noun
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(nautical) The keel and keelson of a ship.

The ship's back broke in the pounding surf.

noun
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(printing) The inside margin of a page.
noun
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(mining) The roof of a horizontal underground passage.
noun
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(slang, uncountable) Effort, usually physical.

Put some back into it!

noun
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(slang, uncountable) Large and attractive buttocks.
noun
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A non-alcoholic drink (often water or a soft drink), to go with hard liquor or a cocktail.
noun
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Among leather dealers, one of the thickest and stoutest tanned hides.
noun
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(side opposite the front or useful side): front.
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(that which is farthest away from the front): front.
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(intransitive) To go in the reverse direction.

The train backed into the station; the horse refuses to back.

verb
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I back you all the way; which horse are you backing in this race?

verb
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(nautical, of the wind) To change direction contrary to its normal pattern (anticlockwise in the northern hemisphere, clockwise in the southern)
verb
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(nautical, of a square sail) To brace the yards so that the wind presses on the front of the sail, to slow the ship.
verb
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(nautical, of an anch) To lay out a second, smaller anchor to provide additional holding power.
verb
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(UK, of a hunting dog) To stand still behind another dog which has pointed.
verb
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To push or force backwards.

To back oxen.

The mugger backed her into a corner and demanded her wallet.

verb
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To make a back for; to furnish with a back.

To back books.

verb
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To adjoin behind; to be at the back of.
verb
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To write upon the back of, possibly as an endorsement.

To back a letter; to back a note or legal document.

verb
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A large shallow vat; a cistern, tub, or trough, used by brewers, distillers, dyers, picklers, gluemakers, and others, for mixing or cooling wort, holding water, hot glue, etc.
noun
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noun
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See back.
prefix
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Situated, located, or toward the rear; backward or in reverse; in return; again.
prefix
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(UK) False; pseudo-.

Backfriend.

prefix
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back and fill
  • To maneuver a vessel in a narrow channel by adjusting the sails so as to let the wind in and out of them in alteration.
  • To vacillate in one's actions or decisions.
idiom
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back to back
  • Consecutively and without interruption:
    Presented three speeches back to back.
idiom
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behind (one's) back
  • In one's absence or without one's knowledge.
idiom
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have got (someone's) back
  • To be prepared or ready to support or vouch for someone, as in a crisis.
idiom
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have (one's) back up
  • To be angry or irritated.
idiom
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off (someone's) back
  • No longer nagging or urging someone to do something.
idiom
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on (someone's) back
  • Persistently nagging or urging someone to do something.
idiom
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back and fill
  • to handle sails so that they alternately spill wind and fill with wind, as in maneuvering in a narrow channel
  • to zigzag
  • to vacillate, as in a decision
idiom
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back and forth
  • to and fro
  • from side to side
idiom
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back away
  • to move or go backward
  • to withdraw from a position, stop holding to an attitude, etc.
idiom
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back down
  • to withdraw from a position or a claim
idiom
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(in) back of
  • at or to the rear of; behind
idiom
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back off
  • to move back a short distance
  • to refrain or cease from pursuing or annoying; lay off
  • to stop supporting a position, holding to an attitude, etc.
idiom
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back out
  • to withdraw from an enterprise
  • to refuse to keep a promise
idiom
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back out of
  • to withdraw from (an enterprise)
  • to refuse to keep (a promise)
idiom
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back up
  • to support or help
  • to move or go backward
  • to accumulate as the result of a stoppage
    Traffic backed up for a mile.
  • to take a position behind (a teammate) in case there should be a mishandled or erratically thrown ball
  • to make a standby or alternate copy of (data, a file, etc.)
idiom
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back water
  • to use oars, a propeller, etc. to move backward or prevent drifting
  • to withdraw from a position or a claim
idiom
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behind someone's back
  • without someone's knowledge or consent
idiom
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be (flat) on one's back
  • to be ill, bedridden, or helpless
idiom
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get off someone's back
  • to stop nagging or harassing someone
idiom
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get one's back up
  • to become angry
idiom
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(informal) go back on
  • to be faithless or disloyal to; betray
  • to fail to keep (a promise, one's word, etc.)
idiom
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have someone's back
  • to watch over, defend, or support someone who is in a vulnerable position
idiom
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put someone's back up
  • to make someone angry
idiom
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turn one's back on
  • to show anger, contempt, etc. toward by turning away from
  • to ignore the plight of; desert; fail
idiom
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watch one's back
  • to be wary against an attack, specif. a treacherous attack
idiom
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with one's back to the wall
  • in a desperate or awkward position or situation, often one in which one finally has to act in response to an attack or demand
idiom
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Origin of back

  • Dutch bak from French bac from Old French boat from Vulgar Latin baccus vessel probably of Celtic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English bak from Old English bæc

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English bak, from Old English bæc, from Proto-Germanic *baką (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak (“back”)), West Frisian bekling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English bak-, bac-, apheretic form of abak, aback (“aback”, adv). More at aback.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Wiktionary