Fore definition

fôr
Earlier in order of occurrence; former.
adjective
7
2
Before; earlier.

Foredoom.

prefix
4
0
Located at or toward the front; forward.
adjective
3
1
Something that is located at or toward the front.
noun
2
1
Situated in front or in front of some other thing or part.
adjective
1
0
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Before, in front of.
prefix
1
0
At, toward, or near the front; forward.
adverb
1
1
Before.
preposition
1
1
Fore is defined as a warning shouted to golfers to warn them that a golf ball has been hit in their direction.

An example of fore is a warning you yell if you have just hit a golf ball into a nearby fairway where other golfers are standing.

interjection
0
0
The definition of fore is something that is in front.

An example of fore is the location of the headlights on a car.

adjective
0
0
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Used by a golfer to warn those ahead that a ball is headed in their direction.
interjection
0
0
In front of; front.

Foredeck.

prefix
0
0
At, in, or toward the bow of a ship.
adverb
0
0
(obs.) Previously.
adverb
0
0
(obs.) Previous; former.
adjective
0
0
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The thing or part in front.
noun
0
0
(obs.) In the sight of; before.
preposition
0
0
(golf) Used as a shout warning players who are farther ahead that one is about to hit the ball.
interjection
0
0
preposition
0
0
The front part of.

Forehead.

affix
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0
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A people of Papua New Guinea.
pronoun
0
0
Their language.
pronoun
0
1
The front part.
noun
1
3
At an earlier time.
adverb
0
2
Before in time, place, order, or rank.

Forenoon, foreman.

affix
0
2
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to the fore
  • In, into, or toward a position of prominence:
    A new virtuoso has come to the fore.
idiom
0
0
to the fore
  • to the front; into view or into prominence
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of fore

  • ME < OE: see fore

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Middle English for-, fore- from Old English from fore in front per1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English beforehand, before, in front of from Old English per1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English, from Old English fōr(e)-, from Proto-Germanic *fura-, *furai- (“before, in front of, for"), from Proto-Indo-European *per-, *pr- (“before, formerly; through, throughout"). Akin to Old Saxon and Old High German fora-, Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌿𐍂𐌰- (faura-) (see 𐍆𐌰𐌿𐍂𐌰 (faura)).

    From Wiktionary