Stem meaning

stĕm
(linguistics) The main part of a word to which affixes are added.
noun
14
3
The definition of a stem is the main stalk of a plant.

An example of stem is the part that holds up the petals on a flower and from which the leaves grow.

noun
14
7
Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.
abbreviation
9
3
To stop or stanch (a flow).

Stemmed the bleeding.

verb
7
1
(nautical) The curved upright beam at the fore of a vessel into which the hull timbers are scarfed to form the prow.
noun
7
3
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To stem a ski or both skis, as in making a turn.
verb
5
0
To have or take origin or descent.

Her success stems mostly from hard work.

verb
5
1
The main line of descent of a family.
noun
5
2
To make headway against (a tide or current, for example).
verb
4
0
A branch of a family.
noun
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0
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A narrow part on certain man-made objects, such as a wine glass, a tobacco pipe, a spoon.
noun
3
0
To restrain or stop.

Wanted to stem the growth of government.

verb
3
1
To plug or tamp (a blast hole, for example).
verb
2
0
(sports) To turn (a ski, usually the uphill ski) by moving the heel outward.
verb
2
0
A supporting structure resembling the stalk of a plant.
noun
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0
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To stop or stanch a flow.

Stemmed the bleeding.

verb
2
0
The main, often long or slender part of a plant that usually grows upward above the ground and supports other parts, such as branches and leaves. Plants have evolved a number of tissue arrangements in the stem. Seedless vascular plants (such as mosses and ferns) have primary vascular tissue in an inner core, a cylindrical ring, or individual strands scattered amid the ground tissue. In eudicots, magnoliids, and conifers, the stem develops a continuous cylindrical layer or a ring of separate bundles of vascular tissue (including secondary vascular tissue) embedded in the ground tissue. In monocots and some herbaceous eudicots, individual strands of primary vascular tissue are scattered in the ground tissue.
2
0
A slender stalk supporting or connecting another plant part, such as a leaf or flower.
2
0
(Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) An umbrella term used by the U.S. government for the major categories of highly skilled occupations. See high tech and STEAM.
2
0
The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors.
noun
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0
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An advanced or leading position; the lookout.
noun
2
0
(botany) The above-ground stalk (technically axis) of a vascular plant, and certain anatomically similar, below-ground organs such as rhizomes, bulbs, tubers, and corms.
noun
2
0
A slender supporting member of an individual part of a plant such as a flower or a leaf; also, by analogy, the shaft of a feather.

The stem of an apple or a cherry.

noun
2
0
(linguistics) The main part of an uninflected word to which affixes may be added to form inflections of the word. A stem often has a more fundamental root. Systematic conjugations and declensions derive from their stems.
noun
2
0
(typography) A vertical stroke of a letter.
noun
2
0
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(nautical) The vertical or nearly vertical forward extension of the keel, to which the forward ends of the planks or strakes are attached.
noun
2
0
To remove the stem from.

To stem cherries; to stem tobacco leaves.

verb
2
0
To be caused or derived; to originate.

The current crisis stems from the short-sighted politics of the previous government.

verb
2
0
To descend in a family line.
verb
2
0
To direct the stem (of a ship) against; to make headway against.
verb
2
0
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To ram (clay, etc.) into a blasting hole.
verb
2
0
To stop, hinder (for instance, a river or blood).

To stem a tide.

verb
2
0
(skiing) To move the feet apart and point the tips of the skis inward in order to slow down the speed or to facilitate a turn.
verb
2
0
Alternative form of steem.
noun
2
0
(countable) Acronym of scanning transmission electron microscope.
noun
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0
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(uncountable) Acronym of science, technology, engineering, (and) mathematics.
noun
2
0
Stem is defined as to originate from.

An example of stem is when an argument arises from a previous statement.

verb
2
1
The tubular glass structure mounting the filament or electrodes in an incandescent bulb or vacuum tube.
noun
2
1
To remove the stem of.

Stemmed the apples.

verb
2
1
To provide with a stem.

Wine glasses that are stemmed.

verb
2
1
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A connecting or supporting part, especially:
  • The tube of a tobacco pipe.
  • The slender upright support of a wineglass or goblet.
  • The small projecting shaft with an expanded crown by which a watch is wound.
  • The rounded rod in the center of certain locks about which the key fits and is turned.
  • The shaft of a feather or hair.
  • The upright stroke of a typeface or letter.
  • (music) The vertical line extending from the head of a note.
noun
1
0
Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.
abbreviation
1
0
(music) A vertical stroke of a symbol representing a note in written music.
noun
1
0
from stem to stern
  • From one end to another.
idiom
1
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of stem

  • Middle English from Old English stefn, stemn stā- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English stemmen from Old Norse stemma

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old Norse stemma (“to stop, stem, dam") (whence Danish stemme/stæmme (“to stem, dam up")), from Proto-Germanic *stammijanÄ…. Cognate with German stemmen; compare stammer.

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English stemn, stefn (“stem, trunk (of a tree)"), from Proto-Germanic *stamniz.

    From Wiktionary