Mute definition

myo͝ot
Refraining from producing speech or vocal sound.
adjective
2
1
The voluntary silencing of a microphone or speaker.
1
0
Expressed without speech; unspoken.

A mute appeal.

adjective
1
1
Mute is defined as silent or not capable of speaking.

An example of something mute is a television with the sound turned off.

adjective
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0
The definition of a mute is a person who chooses to not speak or who cannot speak.

An example of a mute is a person who has always been deaf and has never spoken.

noun
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(law) Declining to enter a plea to a criminal charge.

Standing mute.

adjective
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(offensive) Unable to speak.
adjective
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0
Not pronounced; silent, as the e in the word house.
adjective
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Pronounced with a temporary stoppage of breath, as the sounds (p) and (b); plosive; stopped.
adjective
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0
(offensive) One who is incapable of speech.
noun
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(law) A defendant who declines to enter a plea to a criminal charge.
noun
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(music) Any of various devices used to muffle or soften the tone of an instrument.
noun
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A silent letter.
noun
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A plosive; a stop.
noun
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To soften or muffle the sound of.
verb
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To soften the tone, color, shade, or hue of.
verb
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Not speaking; voluntarily silent.
adjective
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Unable to speak.
adjective
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0
Not spoken.

A mute appeal.

adjective
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0

The letter e in “mouse” is mute.

adjective
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A person who does not speak; specif., one who, deaf from infancy, has not learned to speak.
noun
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(historical) A hired mourner at a funeral.
noun
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(electronics) A setting, control, device, etc., as on a TV receiver or telephone, that may be used to silence the audio temporarily.
noun
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(music) Any of various devices used to soften or muffle the tone of an instrument, as a block placed within the bell of a brass instrument, or a piece set onto the bridge of a violin.
noun
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0
(phonet.) A silent letter.
noun
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To soften or muffle the sound of (a musical instrument, etc.) as with a mute.
verb
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To subdue the intensity of (a color)
verb
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Refraining from producing speech or vocal sound.
adjective
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0
(offensive) Unable to speak.
adjective
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0
Unable to vocalize, as certain animals.
adjective
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0
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(offensive) One who is incapable of speech.
noun
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The act or condition of remaining silent when required to enter a plea.
noun
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0
Not having the power of speech; dumb. [from 15th c.]
adjective
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Silent; not making a sound. [from 15th c.]
adjective
0
0
Not uttered; unpronounced; silent; also, produced by complete closure of the mouth organs which interrupt the passage of breath; said of certain letters.
adjective
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0
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Not giving a ringing sound when struck; said of a metal.
adjective
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0
(phonetics, now historical) A stopped consonant; a stop. [from 16th c.]
noun
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A person who does not have the power of speech. [from 17th c.]
noun
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0
A hired mourner at a funeral; an undertaker's assistant. [from 18th c.]
noun
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(music) An object for dulling the sound of an instrument, especially a brass instrument, or damper for pianoforte; a sordine. [from 18th c.]
noun
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To silence, to make quiet.
verb
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To turn off the sound of.

Please mute the music while I make a call.

verb
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(now rare) Of a bird: to defecate. [from 15th c.]

verb
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0
The faeces of a hawk or falcon.

noun
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To cast off; to moult.
verb
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Unable to vocalize, as certain animals.
adjective
0
1
stand mute
  • to refuse to plead guilty or not guilty
idiom
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0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
mute
Plural:
mutes

Adjective

Base Form:
mute
Superlative:
mutest

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

stand mute

Origin of mute

  • Middle English muet from Old French from diminutive of mu from Latin mūtus

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman muet, moet, Middle French muet, from mu (“dumb, mute") + -et, remodelled after Latin mÅ«tus.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle French muetir, probably a shortened form of esmeutir, ultimately from Proto-Germanic.

    From Wiktionary

  • Latin mutare (“to change").

    From Wiktionary